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Longueville House was built in 1720 by the Longfield family, and first opened it’s doors to the public in 1969. It’s a place of history, yet Longueville has moved with the times. Maintaining and modernizing the house has been a labour of love for third-generation owners William O’Callaghan and his wife Aisling, your hosts. In addition to the welcoming O’Callaghan clan, there are five dogs, two ponies, a flock of sheep, pigs galore and laying hens! At Longueville, your hosts are very proud of the fact that much of their meat and game is reared on the on-site farm. All the vegetables, oriental greens, herbs and much of our summer and autumn fruit come from the three-acre walled kitchen garden. Longueville has won a huge amlunt of awards in recent years – from Frommers & Fodors to Bridgestone & Conde Nast.

Longueville House offer a great selection of comfortable guestrooms. Please note that rooms are free from the intrusion of televisions, in order for one to fully relax, breathe, and appreciate the delights that surround you.
All rooms are individually decorated in a country house style. Some face north overlooking court yard at rear of the house. Others face south overlooking parkland at front of house.

At Longueville Guests may savour the freshest produce from the estate and surrounding areas, in original culinary creations cooked by chef William O’Callaghan and his team in this renowned kitchen.

William trained under Master Chef Raymond Blanc at Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons, a two-Michelin-star restaurant where the menu is described as having ‘a twist of imaginative genius’. William has brought that twist to Ireland’s south-western corner, with meat and game from the estate’s farm such as woodland pork, Longueville lamb, woodcock, snipe, fresh salmon from the Blackwater River, Longueville bees honey, vegetables, fruits, herbs and oriental greens come from the three-acre walled kitchen garden on the estate. At Longueville guests can rest assured that they are getting the freshest ingredients with a menu that promotes a field to fork policy. In one word “Provenance”. Even our water comes from our own wells. Only the extensive New and Old World wine list is drawn from farther afield.

Longueville also offers imaginative alternatives to Vegetarians & Vegans and will happily accommodate with a little notice guests with special dietary requirements such as diabetics, gluten free diets and guests with food allergies.

Afternoon Tea:

Afternoon Tea in Longueville House is an institution in itself and is served in The Drawing Room & Mount Hillary Room of Longueville House in front of a roaring log fire. Afternoon tea is all about  relaxation or catching up with old friends and loved ones and makes for a memorable afternoon whiling away a few hours. We serve two afternoon tea menus: The Traditional Afternoon Tea Menu and The Celebration Afternoon Tea Menu. Both menus includes freshly cut sandwiches, freshly baked soda scones with garden berry preserve and Chantilly cream, followed by a delectable selection of afternoon tea cakes and pastries all served on a three tier stand. In addition The Celebration Afternoon Tea Menu comes with a glass of bubbly and a celebration cake. What a novel and civilised way to celebrate a birthday, anniversary, engagement or just as a treat to yourself!

Mallow Town:

On The Map: Mallow is located in County Cork in southern Ireland. The town is just 35km north of Cork City, and lies on the N20 road that connects the cities of Cork & Limerick.

Mallow is a thriving and prosperous market centre. It’s the largest town along the lovely Blackwater Valley, and a good centre from which to explore that river and many interesting locations in the neighbourhood. The town initially developed as a defensive settlement protecting an important ford on the River Blackwater. The town developed rapidly in the late 16th century as a plantation town. In the 18th and 19th centuries Mallow became famous as a spa resort and was known as ‘The Irish Bath’. The old Mallow Castle (pictured) stands in the middle of the town. Behind it stands the ‘new’ castle, a fine baronial building privately owned and superbly maintained. In the grounds you might catch a glimpse of a herd of white fallow deer. They are all descended from two white bucks presented by Queen Elizabeth I to an earlier owner.

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