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14-Night All-Ireland Vacation

Price: From $2,843 Per Person 14 Nights

For those of you lucky enough to have 14 nights to spend in Ireland, we have devised the perfect All-Ireland vacation. Begin in Ireland's bustling capital, Dublin, and work your way anti-clockwise around the entire country, before staying in closer proximity to Dublin Airport on your last night. Take in the majesty of Ireland's northeast coast, including the mystical Giant's Causeway, and exhilarating Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge. Visit Ancient City Walls and stunning coastal scenery. View 5000-year-old Megalithic Monuments and enjoy traditional Irish music by the open fire in a cozy pub...and that's just the first four days of your breath-taking journey!

Tour Highlights

ACCOMMODATION

  • 12-nights of 4 & 5-star hotels, Unique Irish Manor Houses, and Authentic Irish B&B

TRANSPORTATION

  • Rental Car including our Exclusive Reduced Excess Insurance Package

DINING OPTIONS

  • 14 Full Irish Breakfasts

UNIQUE EXPERIENCES

  • Dublin 'Hop-On, Hop-Off' 2-Day Sightseeing Double-Decker Bus Pass
  • Guinness Connoisseur Experience
  • Food Folk & Fairies
  • Dublin Vintage Tea Tour
  • Mount Falcon Hawk Walk
  • Irish Whiskey Experience and Chocolate pairing.

POINTS OF INTERESTS

  • Belfast City & The Titanic Exhibit
  • The Giant's Causeway & The Glens of Antrim
  • The Connemara National Park & Kylemore Abbey
  • The Cliffs of Moher & Burren Region along the Wild Atlantic Way
  • The Rock of Cashel & Glendalough
  • The Guinness Storehouse
  • Trinity College & The Book of Kells
  • St. Patrick's Cathedral & Dublin Castle
  • The Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge & Dunluce Castle
  • Slieve League & Glenveagh National Park
  • Glencar Waterfall
  • Croagh Patrick & Achill Island 
  • Killarney National Park & Ross Castle
  • The Ring of Kerry and the Dingle Peninsula

Dublin, County Dublin

Arrive at

Arrive at Dublin Airport, County Dublin

Arrive at Dublin Airport after your overnight flight if you are coming from the U.S. or Canada.

Dublin is Ireland's main airport - located just north of Dublin City.
If you are heading downtown, it takes approximately 20 to 30 minutes from the airport, depending on traffic.
There are 2 terminals at Dublin Airport, the second of which opened to air traffic in November 2010.
Most flights from the U.S. (on Aer Lingus, Delta, United, US Airways & American Airlines) arrive into Terminal 2.


Accommodation

Brooks Hotel - Dublin, County Dublin

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Included Experiences

Vintage Tea Experience

Dublin, County Dublin

Enjoy our renowned Afternoon Tea delicacies, good conversation and tap along to some fabulous 1950’s jazz. This is Afternoon Tea with a difference. Board your vintage Routemaster bus near Custom House and sit at your appointed table. Soak up the nostalgia as your sociable tour escort gets the conversation started, the 1950s jazz starts up, and a classic afternoon tea is served. Savor all your afternoon tea favorites- finger sandwiches, desserts, cakes, and pastries—as your bus travels through downtown Dublin. Pass sights such as St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Christ Church, Trinity College, St. Stephen’s Green, Wood Quay, O’Connell Street, Phoenix Park, and the grand buildings of Georgian Dublin. There’s no formal commentary, but expect to hear some favorite Dublin stories from your host before you return to where you started.


Overnight Location

Dublin, County Dublin

On the Map: Dublin, Ireland's Capital City is located on the east coast of the country, and is well served by infrastructure linking it to all parts of the Emerald Isle.

Dublin is a lively cosmopolitan city brimming with culture. You could spend your time strolling the streets soaking up the atmosphere, relaxing in its cafes and bars or you could check out its myriad historical, literary and cultural delights. The 8th century illuminated manuscript, the Book of Kells, must be viewed. It is on display at the impressive Trinity College, Ireland's first university (founded 1592) in the heart of Dublin. For the rest of your time, it is up to you how much you want to pack in. Phoenix Park (twice the size of New York City's Central Park), Georgian Dublin around Stephen's Green, Dublin Castle, the National Botanical Gardens, National Museum, Kilmainham Gaol and the Hugh Lane Municipal Art Gallery are all highly recommended stops on your tour. Then there's the Guinness Storehouse and Jameson Distillery.  A visit to Dublin's Temple Bar to experience the lively Dublin pub culture is a must, though many of Dublin's best bars can be found outside this area in the streets and laneways around Grafton Street, the shopper's street of choice. Purchasing a 'hop-on, hop-off' Dublin Bus Tour ticket is a great way to get around and see all the major sites at a very reasonable cost.


Must-See Sites

Grafton Street, County Dublin

On The Map: Grafton Street runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south to College Green in the north

Grafton Street is without doubt Ireland's premier shopping street - in terms of retail rent, it's the fifth most expensive in the world! With beautiful historic buildings housing iconic Irish businesses such as Brown Thomas, Weir & Sons and Bewley’s Grafton Street Café, Grafton Street offers an experience that cannot be found elsewhere in the country. Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianized, with the exception of a short stretch that runs between Nassau Street and College Green and contains the 18th century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. If shopping's not your thing, Grafton Street is still worth checking out. It's a bustling, atmospheric spot, and high quality street performers including musicians, poets and mime-artists commonly perform to the shopping crowds.


Guinness Storehouse, County Dublin

On The Map: The Guinness Storehouse is centrally located in Dublin City at St. James Gate, just off Crane Street and south of the River Liffey. The Storehouse is a leisurely 20 minute stroll west of Trinity College.

Come and explore Ireland’s top visitor attraction, providing an unforgettable welcome and a magical journey deep into the heart of the world famous Guinness brand and company. The Guinness Storehouse is located in the heart of the Guinness Brewery at St James’s Gate, Dublin. Housed in an old fermentation plant, the seven-story visitor experience tells the epic tale of Ireland’s iconic drink and brings to life the heritage of Guinness from early days to growth as a global brand, known all around the world. The experience starts standing at the bottom of the world’s largest pint glass, which rises through the building.  It’s a dramatic story that begins over 250 years ago and ends in The Gravity Bar where visitors will receive a complimentary pint of Guinness while relaxing and enjoying spectacular views over Dublin. 


Trinity College, County Dublin

On The Map: Trinity College is located in the heart of Dublin City. Just south of the River Liffey, the campus grounds are bordered by Grafton, College, Pearse, Nassau & Leinster Streets.

Time spent in Dublin would not be complete without a visit to Trinity College. Founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1st, it is one of the oldest universities in the British Isles, and the very oldest in Ireland. Standing on a self contained site in the very heart of Dublin, the College itself covers some 35 acres of cobbled squares and green spaces surrounded by buildings which represent the accumulated architectural riches of nearly three centuries. Although Trinity offers much of interest to the visitor, the crown jewel is without doubt the Book of Kells. The Book is an 'illuminated manuscript', globally celebrated for its lavish decoration. The manuscript contains the four Gospels in Latin based on a Vulgate text, written on vellum (prepared calfskin), in a bold and expert version of the script known as 'insular majuscule'. Written in the 9th century, it has been on display in the Old Library at Trinity College Dublin from the mid-19th century, and attracts over 500,000 visitors a year.


Dublin, County Dublin

Accommodation

Brooks Hotel - Dublin, County Dublin

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Included Experiences

Guinness Connoisseur Experience

Dublin, County Dublin

The Connoisseur Experience is the ultimate tasting experience for the ultimate Guinness fan. Gather in the luxurious private bar, discreetly tucked away in a secluded area of the Guinness Storehouse where you will embark on a journey through tastes, traditions, and stories of the most popular variants of Guinness beer - Guinness Draught, Guinness Original, Guinness Foreign Extra Stout, and one of the beers from The Brewers Project range. You will also have the opportunity to learn the craft of how to pour the perfect pint of your very own Guinness. This experience is an exclusive added feature to the general admission tickets which include a self-guided tour of the visitor experience and a complimentary pint of Guinness or soft drink.


Food, Folklore & Fairies

Dublin, County Dublin

Discover how Irish people lived in times past while enjoying a traditional candlelit dinner in Dublin's oldest pub, The Brazen Head (est. 1198). The evening unfolds in an intimate setting above the pub. As you relax between courses, be taken back in time by renowned storytellers, to the fascinating world of Ireland long ago, when the culture was one of the mind, spirit and imagination. Discover how Irish people lived off the land and why the humble potato so influenced our history. Explore their beliefs and superstitions surrounding the otherworld of the fairies. Listen to the magical tales they told as they gathered around the fire at night, and enjoy live traditional Irish music and ballads while having dinner.


Must-See Sites

Dublin Museums, County Dublin

Dublin has long been recognized as a center of art & culture. The city is literally awash with interesting museums and galleries of all types and sizes.
It's impossible to make note of them all, but three of the best are:
The Chester Beatty Library: Alfred Chester Beatty, a New Yorker donated a fantastic collection of books to the city of Dublin. Highlights include papyrus scripts, valuable copies of the Koran, Buddhist & Far Eastern literature, as well as early mediaeval manuscripts.
National Museum of Ireland - Archaeology: Enter this museum and be transported back in time to almost 7000BC! Gold and other treasures recount a varied Irish history through Christian and pre-Christian times. A range of exhibitions also present artifacts from many other cultures and regions.
National Gallery: Here you can admire European works of art from the late Middle Ages to the end of the 19th century. As well as Irish artists, the Gallery also boasts works by Angelico, Goya, Gainsborough & Reynolds, to name but a few.


Saint Patrick's Cathedral, County Dublin

On The Map: Saint Patrick's Cathedral is located in the heart of Dublin City, just south of the River Liffey, and west of such landmarks as Trinity College and Grafton Street. The Cathedral is located at the junction of Patrick Street and Upper Kevin Street.

Built in honour of Ireland’s patron saint, Saint Patrick’s Cathedral has contributed much to Irish life since its founding in 1191. The Cathedral stands adjacent to the famous well, at which St Patrick himself reportedly baptized converts on his visit to Dublin. The writer and satirist Jonathan Swift was Dean of Saint Patrick's from 1713 to 1747, and is buried within the church. In a romantic twist, Esther Johnson (Stella) is buried next to Swift. Although never married, Swift had a life-long, intense and mysterious relationship with Stella, and she was an inspiration for much of his work. Handel's Messiah received its first performance there in 1742, sung by the combined choir of Saint Patrick's and Christ Church. Music has played an integral part in the life of Saint Patrick's since its foundation and it is the only cathedral in these islands to sing two services every day. Living Stones, the cathedral's permanent exhibition, celebrates Saint Patrick's place in the life of the city, its history and its role at the dawn of the third millennium. It emphasises that the cathedral is not a museum, but a building embracing the past to herald the future.


Temple Bar, County Dublin

On The Map: Temple Bar lies in the heart of Dublin City. Located on the south bank of the River Liffey, and just west of Trinity College and Grafton Street.

The lively and vibrant Temple Bar District - Dublin's Cultural Quarter, is well worth a visit. Best known for being Dublin’s major nightlife center, Temple Bar comes alive after dark, with many pubs, restaurants and nightclubs to choose from. For those visiting during the day, the area boasts a timeless charm, with narrow cobbled streets and a plethora of cultural organizations, such as the Irish Film Centre & Project Arts Centre. There are also a variety of small galleries and stores - perfect for a day of shopping. While Temple Bar after dark might not be for everyone, the area is the perfect spot to spend a sunny afternoon. 


Dublin Castle, County Dublin

Since its foundation in 1204, Dublin Castle has been at the heart of the history and evolution of Dublin.  Today, spanning an area of over 44,000 square meters (11 acres), the site contains 2 museums, 2 cafés, an international conference centre, 2 gardens, Government Buildings and the State Apartments (the most important state rooms in the country). The grounds of the Castle are free to explore, as is the Chapel Royal, the Chester Beatty Library, the Garda Museum and the Revenue Museum.  Access to the State Apartments is by guided tour only and tickets may be purchased from the Apartments in the Upper Castle Yard.


Belfast, County Antrim

Accommodation

Europa Hotel - Belfast, County Antrim

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Enroute Sightseeing

Newgrange, County Meath

On the Map: Newgrange is located just north of Dublin City in County Meath in the east of Ireland. Newgrange is reached via the N51 road, which intersects with the main M1 motorway (connecting Dublin & Belfast) near the town of Drogheda.

Newgrange, in County Meath, crouches on a rise just north of the River Boyne. It is the focal point for a ceremonial area and megalithic cemetery that is 5,000 years old.  The tombs' passage is perfectly aligned to mark the Winter Solstice. Newgrange is one of the best examples in Western Europe of the type of monument known as a passage-grave or passage-tomb. According to the most reliable Carbon 14 dating techniques, Newgrange was constructed around 3200BC. This means it is at least 600 years older than the Giza Pyramids in Egypt, and 1,000 years older than its British counterpart, Stonehenge. If you are interested in visiting Newgrange during summer months, we highly recommend planning to arrive very early in the morning to guarantee entrance to this extremely popular site!


Enroute Sightseeing

Carlingford, County Louth

On the Map: Carlingford is located in the northeast of Ireland, and splits the distance between the major cities of Dublin (to the south) and Belfast (to the north). From the main M1 motorway connecting Belfast & Dublin, Carlingford is accessed via the R173, intersecting just north of Dundalk.

The small fishing village of Carlingford on the Cooley Peninsula nestles between Slieve Foy, Carlingford Lough and the Mourne mountains. A unique blend of natural beauty, spectacular panoramas, myths and legends combine to make Carlingford a very special place. It is Ireland's best preserved medieval town giving it a unique feel and atmosphere. Carlingford is also the Oyster capital of the country and every August the oyster festival draws huge crowds into the pretty village of white washed cottages and ancient clustered buildings. The mythical Tain Way walking route starts in the town and completing even a short portion of it will reward you with magical views of Carlingford Lough and the Mourne Mountains.


Overnight Location

Belfast, County Antrim

On The Map: Belfast, the capital of Northern Ireland, is located in the northeastern corner of the country in County Antrim. Belfast is well served by a network of good roads, including the M1 motorway from Dublin City.

Approximately one third of the population of Northern Ireland - about half a million people - live in Belfast. It's setting is very attractive, nestling in a semicircle of hills, where the River Langan enters Belfast Lough. The city got it's name from Beile Feirst  "the mouth of the sandy ford" - and was founded in 1177 when the Anglo-Normans built a castle here. It began to really expand in the 17th century with the development of the local linen and shipbuilding industries (the Titanic was built here).  Sights to see in Belfast City, the Belfast City Hall, built of Portland stone in Classical Renaissance style, dominates the city center.  The Linen Hall Library, founded in 1788 is an absolute delight, a cultural centre with exhibitions, a Theater & Performing Arts Archive and a Genealogy and Heraldry collection. Away from the city center you have the Ulster Museum in the Botanic Gardens, near Queens University which has miles of galleries and exhibitions. This lively and friendly city, with historic buildings standing side-by-side with modern creations is a delight not to be missed.


Must-See Sites

Belfast Castle and Cave Hill, County Antrim

On The Map: Belfast Castle is located just 4 miles north of the city centre on the slopes of Cave Hill. It is well signposted from the nearby Antrim Road.

Belfast Castle Estate is adjacent to one of the highest spots in Belfast, Cave Hill - at 400 feet above sea level, the castle offers stunning views over Belfast Lough and the city. Built in the 19th century, Belfast Castle is a Scottish Baronial style castle featuring unrivaled views of the city of Belfast. While the area played host to two castles before the one that stands today, the current Belfast Castle was finished in 1870. After serving the Shaftesbury family, the castle and its surrounding estate was presented to the city of Belfast in 1934. Between 1945 and 1970s, the castle was a popular venue for weddings, dances and afternoon teas. After a period of refurbishment between 1978 and 1988, the castle reopened and continued to host weddings, business meetings, and events. Head to the castle to explore its grounds and enjoy a meal at the Cellar Restaurant. 

Cave Hill Visitor Centre is located on the second floor of Belfast Castle. This intriguing museum is open Monday to Saturday, 9am to 10pm, and Sundays from 9am to 5.30pm, and admission is free!

The Cellar Restaurant within the castle is open every day from 11am-5pm serving snacks, light refreshments, and lunch.


Titanic Belfast, County Antrim

On The Map: Titanic Belfast is located on Queen's Road in Belfast's northeastern 'Titanic Quarter'. The land on which it stands was formerly owned by the famous Harland & Wolff Shipping Company - builders of Titanic in 1912.

Opened on March 31, 2012, Titanic Belfast is a very impressive, state-of-the-art facility that covers more than 130,000 square feet. The striking building took more than 4 years to construct at a cost of GB 77 million pounds. It stands at 126 feet high - the exact same height as the hull of the famous, doomed ship. Titanic Belfast extends over nine galleries, with multiple dimensions to the exhibition, drawing together special effects, dark rides, full-scale reconstructions and innovative interactive features to explore the Titanic story in a fresh and insightful way; from her conception in Belfast in the early 1900s, through her construction and launch, to her infamous maiden voyage and catastrophic demise. The journey goes beyond the aftermath of the sinking, to the discovery of the wreck and continues into the present day with a live undersea exploration centre.


Derry, County Derry

Accommodation

Beech Hill Country House Hotel - Derry, County Derry

Manor
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Enroute Sightseeing

Dunluce Castle, County Antrim

On The Map: Dunluce Castle is located on the coast of County Antrim in Northern Ireland. The town is accessed via the A2 road that connects the towns of Portrush to the west & Bushmills to the east.

Dunluce Castle is sited dramatically close to the edge of a headland, along the North Antrim coast. One could spend hours marvelling at such a wondrous feat of construction 500 years ago! Surrounded by jaw dropping coastal scenery, this medieval castle stands where an early Irish fort was once built, and its history can be traced back to early Christians and Vikings. The Castle has a rich and varied history, connected with such famous names as Richard de Burgh, Sorley Boy MacDonnell, and Sir John Perrott. Dunluce Village which once surrounded the castle was destroyed by fire during the siege of 1641, but some archaelogical remnants of walls remain. Also nearby are the ancient church ruins of St. Cuthbert's, and the site was witness to the sinking of the colony ship the Exmouth, bound for Quebec, which broke up on rocks off Islay with 240 deaths in 1847. The site features a visitor centre, shop and guided tours of the ruins, gardens and remnants of the town. As if all that were not enough, Dunluce has become even more alluring to visitors in recent years, since starring in HBO's Game of Thrones. The castle was the perfect location for bleak Pyke of House Greyjoy on the Iron Islands.


Enroute Sightseeing

Glens of Antrim, County Antrim

On The Map: County Antrim is located in the northeast corner of Northern Ireland.

The Glens of Antrim (there are 9) are beautifully unique and a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Within twenty square miles you can enjoy natural landscape that covers glacial valleys, sandy beaches, vertical cliffs, tundra plateau, boglands, wooded decidious glens, coniferous forests, waterfalls and picturesque villages! Antrim's coast, from the busy port of Larne to the resorts of Portrush and Portstewart, is dotted with beaches and rocky inlets. Ancient sites and places of intrigue abound too. In addition to wonderful scenery, the landscape is dominated by spectacular ruins of fortresses built by Gaelic chieftains and Norman invaders. Ireland's first inhabitants, nomadic boatmen from Scotland, are believed to have landed in this area around 7000 BC. 


Enroute Sightseeing

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, County Antrim

On The Map: Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge is located near the small town of Ballintoy, in County Antrim Northern Ireland. The rope bridge connects the mainland to the tiny island of Carrick in the northeast corner of Northern Ireland.

Spanning a chasm some eighty feet deep is the famous Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge, it's construction once consisted of a single rope hand rail and widely spaced slats which the fishermen would traverse across with salmon caught off the island to which it leads. The single handrail was subsequently replaced by a two hand railed bridge, and the current, caged bridge was installed by the National Trust during Easter of 2000 as a further safety measure. Although no-one has ever been injured falling off the old or new bridge, there have been many instances of visitors being unable to face the return walk back across the bridge, resulting in them being taken off the island by boat, so not an activity for the faint-hearted!


Enroute Sightseeing

Giant's Causeway, County Antrim

On the Map: The Giant's Causeway is located in County Antrim on the northeastern coast of Northern Ireland. The Causeway is accessed via Causeway Road that runs north from the main A2 road (connecting Bushmills to the west and Ballycastle to the east).

The Giant's Causeway is a UNESCO Heritage site located in Northern Ireland. During the Paleogene period, County Antrim was subject to intense volcanic activity. As lava rapidly cooled, unique contraction and fracturing occurred, creating the distinctive hexagonal columns seen today. Irish legend of course has an alternate tale of the Causeway's creation!: The Irish giant Fionn MacCumhaill (Fionn McCool) built the causeway to walk to Scotland to fight his Scottish counterpart Benandonner. One version of the legend tells that Fionn fell asleep before he got to Scotland. When he did not arrive, the much larger Benandonner crossed the bridge looking for him. To protect Fionn, his wife Oonagh laid a blanket over him and pretended that the sleeping giant was actually their baby son. When Benandonner saw the size of the 'infant', he assumed the alleged father, Fionn, must be gigantic indeed. Benandonner fled home in terror, ripping up the Causeway in case he was followed by Fionn, and therefore only the Irish coastal steps remain.


Overnight Location

Derry, County Derry

On the Map: Derry City is located close to the northern coast in Northern Ireland. Derry is accessed via the N15/N13 from Donegal (to the southwest) and the A6 from Belfast (to the southeast).

The story of Derry is a long and tumultuous one. Set on a hill on the banks of the Foyle estuary, strategically close to the open sea, it came under siege and attack for over a thousand years. You can walk along the great 17th-century walls, about a mile round and 18 feet thick, which withstood several sieges and even today are unbroken and complete, with old cannon still pointing their black noses over the ramparts. The great siege lasted for 105 days. Today, there’s an atmosphere of optimism in Derry and the city buzzes with life. It’s an artistic city, with theatres, galleries and other cultural centres and a number of annual festivals. Its people, with their gentle accent, are very welcoming.


Derry, County Derry

Accommodation

Beech Hill Country House Hotel - Derry, County Derry

Manor
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Must-See Sites

Killybegs, County Donegal

On the Map: Killybegs is a County Donegal coastal town in the northwest of Ireland. The town is accessed via the N56 and R263 from Donegal town (30 minutes away to the east).

Killybegs is Ireland's premier fishing port. Located on the northwest coast of Ireland, this natural harbour provides a perfect gateway to the Atlantic Ocean. It is an excellent place to base yourself when touring the south west of Donegal. A lively fishing town with Ireland's largest fleet of trawlers. Killybegs is a bustling town where local and foreign ships tower over the quayside. With large numbers of both trendy and modern restaurants and the more traditional pubs, Killybegs offers the visitor a variety of good food, drink and entertainment.


Glenveagh National Park, County Donegal

On The Map: Glenveagh National Park lies in the heart of the Derryveagh Mountains in the northwest of County Donegal, in the northwest corner of Ireland. Access from Letterkenny Town is via the N56 road through Kilmacrennan, turning left onto the Gweedore road - R255, or alternatively via Church Hill, and past Gartan and Akibbon Lakes on the R251.

Glenveagh National Park is a remote and hauntingly beautiful wilderness of rugged mountains and pristine lakes. Donegal gets fewer tourists than other locations in Ireland, but with the remarkable backdrops of Mount Errigal (Donegal’s highest mountain) and Muckish, this is one of the most tranquil and scenic national parks in the country. Populated with red deer, the Park, which covers more than 40,000 acres, consists of three areas. The largest of these is the former Glenveagh Estate, including most of the Derryveagh Mountains. To the west are the quartzite hills around Crocknafarragh and to the south, the peatlands of Lough Barra bog, Meenachullion and Crockastoller. Glenveagh Castle and Gardens are at the heart of the park. The castle was built in the 19th century by the controversial John Adair, who evicted no less than 244 tenants from the homes, because they were spoiling his view! Access to the interior is by tour only, but morning and afternoon teas are served in the castle tearooms all season. The Park Visitor Centre houses exhibitions and an audio-visual show.


Slieve League, County Donegal

On the Map: Slieve League is located in County Donegal on the northwest coast of Ireland. The area is accessed via the R263 road that heads west from the fishing village of Killybegs.

The Slieve League cliffs are said to be the highest and one of the finest marine cliffs in Europe. To fully enjoy the spectacle of Slieve League, it is best to leave your car at the car park and walk the few miles to the cliffs so as not to miss the exciting scenery of the area. (You can lift the gate and drive to the top if you are unable to walk. Note there is only a small parking area at the top) There are terrific views of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sligo Mountains and Donegal Bay as you walk towards the exceptionally high top of Slieve League, where the cliff face of Bunglas rises over 600 metres above the raging seas below. Experienced walkers only should venture beyond the viewing point onto One Man's Pass which loops around onto the Pilgrim's Path.


Donegal, County Donegal

On the Map: Donegal town is located in County Donegal in the northwest of Ireland. The N15 road connecting the cities of Sligo (to the southwest) and Derry (to the northwest) passes-by just east of the town.

Donegal Town is famous for being the former home to the O'Donnell Clan, who played a pivotal role in Irish history. From the 15th to the 17th century, they provided the main opposition to the colonisation of Ireland by England. The town itself contains Donegal castle, on the banks of the River Eske and the remains of a Franciscan abbey which dates back to the 15th century on the Southern shore of the Bay. The Annals of the Four Masters are traditionally thought to have been started in the abbey in the early 17th century. The story of Red Hugh O'Donnell, Lord of Tyrconnell, was the inspiration behind many books and films, not least, Disney's The Fighting Prince of Donegal (1966).


Enniskillen, County Fermanagh

Accommodation

The Manor House - Enniskillen, County Fermanagh

4 Star
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in is after 3.00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out before 12.00 noon.


Enroute Sightseeing

Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery, County Sligo

On The Map: Carrowmore is located just 4 kilometres southwest of Sligo Town, and is reached via the R292 (Strandhill) road which intersects with the main N4 to Dublin.

This is the largest cemetery of megalithic tombs in Ireland and is also among the country's oldest, with monuments ranging from five and a half thousand to six and a half thousand years old. Archaeologists have recorded over 60 tombs of which 30 are visible. A restored cottage houses an exhibition relating to the site. Access to the tombs may be difficult for people with disabilities. Visitors are advised to wear shoes suitable for walking on uneven terrain.


Overnight Location

Enniskillen, County Fermanagh

On the Map: Enniskillen is located almost exactly in the centre of County Fermanagh in the southwest corner of Northern Ireland. The town is well connected via the A4 coming from Sligo town (to the west), and the A4 coming from Belfast (to the east).

Enniskillen is the County Town of Fermanagh, and separates the Upper and Lower sections of Lough Erne. The town is home to a population of approximately 11,500, by far the largest settlement in the County. As one would expect, the town is a retail centre for the County, and beyond, but it has yet to succumb to the blandness which infects many modern towns. The town centre is firmly built along the long, narrow Main St, which actually changes name six times along its length! This gives the town a real sense of bustle and life as well as imbuing the shops with their own unique character. There is no new, anonymous, development to be found on the Main Street and the established High Street Stores sit comfortably beside small independent traders, creating a special atmosphere for the place. A feature of Enniskillen which is becoming increasingly unusual is the number of small bars and hostelries which appear on the Main Street, providing welcome relief from the shops!


Must-See Sites

Glencar Waterfall, County Leitrim

On The Map: Glencar Waterfall lies about 8 miles north of Sligo town, and 5 miles west of Manorhamilton, just off the N16 road that connects the two towns.

With a drop of approx. 50 feet, Glencar Waterfall is not the largest in the world. It does however occupy a wonderfully scenic and romantic location, and is particularly impressive after rain. The setting and charm of the waterfall inspired Ireland's famous poetic son, W.B Yeats, and is mentioned in his poem, 'The Stolen Child'. The falls are accessed via a lovely wooded walk and on-site picnic facilities are provided. There are more waterfalls visible from the road, but none are quite as romantic as this one! The waterfall is adjacent to serene Glencar Lake on the Sligo / Leitrim border - a most enchanting area.


Ballina, County Mayo

Accommodation

Mount Falcon Country House Hotel - Ballina, County Mayo

Manor
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time starts at 3 PM

Check-out time is 11 AM


Included Experiences

Mount Falcon Hawk Walk

Ballina, County Mayo

Take a journey with a hawk on your gloved fist through the beautiful, indigenous woodlands of the Mount Falcon Estate. Get up close and enjoy an interactive experience as the Hawks fly through the woods and return on command. You are the falconer, with a little help from our experienced falconer, of course. Practice and participate in a living human heritage art, “The Traditional Sport of Kings” as the Hawks showcase their hunting techniques and flying skills.  The first time your Hawk swoops down from a 100 foot tree top, glides majestically through the woods, weaving between branches and narrow gaps at speeds of up to 60 kph and lands, with all the weight of a feather, onto your gloved fist, is a memory you will cherish forever. A Hawk Walk is the ideal family activity, suitable for all ages.


Overnight Location

Ballina, County Mayo

On The Map: Ballina is located in the central-north of County Mayo, at the mouth of the River Moy on Killala Bay.

Ballina is County Mayo's largest town. The town boasts a rich variety of pubs, shops, restaurants and nightlife. Among Ballina's key visitor attractions are the ruins of Moyne Abbey, and Rosserk Friary, which dates from the 15th century, and the impressive St Muredach's Cathedral, which stands imposingly on the banks of the River Moy. The River Moy is internationally acknowledged as an exceptional salmon fishery, producing several thousand salmon annually. The famous Ridge Pool, a salmon anglers paradise, is located in the heart of the town. Each year in July, Ballina ignites into a frenzy of activity with its annual Festival. Over the past four years it has developed into one of Ireland's major festivals, providing a week long feast of free entertainment for the entire family - music, song, theatre, art, heritage, culture and novelty events.


Must-See Sites

Achill Island, County Mayo

On the Map: Achill Island is located off County Mayo on the west coast of Ireland. The island is accessed via land bridge from the N59 road connecting the cities of Westport & Bangor. 

Achill Island is the largest island in Ireland at 60 square miles and is accessible from the mainland by a land bridge. Here you can visit the quaint villages of Dooagh and Dooega, the high cliffs at Slievemore and Minaun and the magnificent beaches at Keel and Keem, under Achill Head. No visit to the Island would be complete without taking a journey of scenic splendour on the famous Wild Atlantic Way Drive which circuits the island. Achill's beautiful unspoiled, remote scenery and clear waters make it ideally suited to outdoor pursuits. You can explore the island's peaceful countryside with a beach walk, hill walk, or even a road walk! You can rent bicycles on the island if you would like to cover more distance. You can climb the highest mountain on the island, Mt. Slievemore (about 1800 feet), with ease and have a remarkable view of the area, or opt take a walk up the third highest point, Mt. Minaun and walk along the Minaun cliffs.


Croagh Patrick, County Mayo

On The Map: Croagh Patrick is a 764 metres mountain, located just 8 kilometres southwest of Westport town in County Mayo.

Croagh Patrick is Ireland's sacred mountain, and has been since ancient times. In pre-Christian Ireland it was the focus of the harvest festival of Lughnasa, traditionally held around August 1. The mountain was especially important for women, who would sleep on the summit during Lughnasa to encourage fertility. According to Christian tradition, St. Patrick went up the sacred mountain at festival time in 441 AD. After fasting at the summit for 40 days, he banished all the snakes and demons from Ireland. The site quickly became an important place of Christian pilgrimage & a stone oratory dating from between 430 and 890 AD was recently discovered on the summit. Nowadays, as many as one million pilgrims and visitors make the trek to the top to pray at the stations of the cross, participate in Mass, do penance (in which case the rocky journey is undertaken barefoot!) or simply to enjoy the spectacular view.


Ballina, County Mayo

Accommodation

Mount Falcon Country House Hotel - Ballina, County Mayo

Manor
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time starts at 3 PM

Check-out time is 11 AM


Must-See Sites

Connemara National Park, County Galway

On The Map: Connemara National park is located in County Galway in the west of Ireland. The main park entrance is close to the village of Letterfrack on the main N59 road that connects Clifden to the south, and Westport to the northeast.

Connemara National Park covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park's mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range. Connemara National Park was established and opened to the public in 1980. Much of the present Park lands formed part of the Kylemore Abbey Estate and the southern part of the Park was at one time owned by Richard 'Humanity Dick' Martin, who helped form the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals during the early 19th century. The Park has a Visitor's Centre (open March to October), that offers an audio-visual presentation about the region. 4 rewarding hiking trails begin at the centre, and a tea-room, playground and picnic area are also available. As well as its great natural beauty, many remains of human presence can be found in the Park. The oldest are megalithic court tombs some 4,000 years old. There is also an early 19th century graveyard about which little is known. Ruined houses, a disused lime kiln, old sheep pens, an ice house, drainage systems and old walls in various parts of the Park, are all evidence of a greater population and more extensive use of these lands in the past.


Sky Road, Clifden, County Galway

On The Map: The Sky Road drive begins in Clifden Town. Clifden is located on Ireland's west coast in the Connemara Region of County Galway. Clifden is reached via the N59 road from Galway to the southeast, and Westport to the northeast.

The Sky Road is an exhilarating 11km/7ml circular drive west of Clifden Town. The Sky Road is well signposted from Clifden. You will first pass Abbeyglen Castle Hotel (on your left), and after approx 400 metres beyond the hotel, take a look back towards Clifden. The 12 Bens mountains provide a wonderful backdrop to the town, and its two church spires, complete Clifden's distinctive skyline. The scenery along the Sky Road is quite simply, stunning. As you travel, the Sky Road separates into the lower and upper roads. The lower road takes you along the shoreline, and although pleasant, the upper road is more popular, owing to the commanding views it offers over the entire area. As the upper road rises, you are treated to breathtaking island & coastline views. There is a good-sized car park at the highest point of the upper road for wonderful photo opportunities. If you continue along the Sky Road thereafter, you will eventually join the main N59 Road, a few kilometres north of Clifden.


Doolin, County Clare

Accommodation

Sheedy's Doolin - Doolin, County Clare

Guesthouse
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is between 2.00pm & 7.00pm on your day of arrival. If you expect to arrive outside these hours, please call the property on 086 070 6263.


Enroute Sightseeing

The Burren, County Clare

On the Map: The Burren is located in the north of County Clare in Ireland's west. The closest town is Ballyvaughan to the north, but the Burren is also easily accessible from Doolin, Lisdoonvarna (to the west) and Ennis (to the south).

The Burren, or Boireann, meaning Great Rock, is in County Clare. It is, without dispute, one of the most unique - and strangest - landscapes in Europe.  The Burren occupiues approximately 250 square kilometers. Bounded by the Atlantic on the west and rocked by Galway Bay to the north, it is a multi-layered landscape where rare and delicate plants have adapted in order to thrive and flourish between harsh crevices. Stroll the meadows, be astonished by the boulders, and read the trail marks and footprints that the ice age and volcanoes left behind. The Burren is littered with ancient and megalithic sites. The most dramatic of these is the Poulnabrone Dolmen, an impressive 5,000 year old portal tomb. Poulnabrone is one of the most famous megalithic monuments in Ireland. Just how the people of the time managed to get the truly massive capstone in place, is a mystery which continues to baffle archaeologists.


Enroute Sightseeing

Cong, County Mayo

On the Map: Cong is located in County Mayo in the midwest of Ireland. The village is 45 minutes/ 43km north of Galway City, and is most easily accessed via the R334/R346 road that intersects with the main N84 road connecting Galway & Castlebar cities.

Cong is without doubt most famous for being the location of John Ford's 1951 classic, "The Quiet Man", starring John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara. The Quiet Man Cottage Museum allows visitors to relive the movie as if actually on-set.  Painstaking effort has ensured that all the furnishings, artifacts, costumes - etc. are authentic reproductions. The majestic remains of Cong Abbey are the relics of an Augustinian abbey founded in the 12th century by Turlough O'Connor, King of Connaught and High King of Ireland.  The Cross of Cong, an ornate processional cross intended for the abbey, is now in Dublin's National Museum. Ashford Castle, perhaps Ireland's most exquisite castle hotel is located just outside the village.


Overnight Location

Doolin, County Clare

On the Map: The small village of Doolin is located on County Clare’s west Atlantic coast. The village is accessed via the R479 - a small country road that intersects with the R478 connecting the towns of Lisdoonvarna (to the north) and Lahinch (to the south).

People flock to Doolin from all over the world to sample wonderful, top quality traditional music in the local pubs. Until recently Doolin had only three pubs. There are now some new establishments on the scene but we recommend sticking to the old reliables: McGann’s, McDermots and O’Connor’s. Even at that you will be spoiled for choice. Each pub is full most nights with musicians and music lovers alike. Be sure to check out all three! The surrounding area has much of interest including the barren yet strikingly beautiful Burren region with, among other things, the 5,000 year-old Poulnabrone Dolmen. Also worth a visit is Doonagore Castle and of course the spectacular 650-foot high Cliffs of Moher, which are only a few miles from Doolin.


Must-See Sites

Cliffs of Moher, County Clare

On the Map: The Cliffs of Moher are located on the western coast of County Clare. The Cliffs are accessed via the R478 road that connects Doolin (to the north) and the seaside town of Lahinch (to the southeast).

The Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland's top Visitor attractions. The Cliffs stand 214 metres (700 feet) tall at their highest point and range for 8 kilometres over the Atlantic Ocean on the western seaboard of County Clare. O'Brien's Tower, constructed by Sir Cornellius O'Brien in 1835, stands proudly on a headland of the majestic Cliffs. From the Cliffs one can see the Aran Islands, Galway Bay, as well as The Twelve Pins, the Maum Turk Mountains in Connemara and Loop Head to the South. There are two paths to take north and south along the cliff edge, providing spectacular views all the way.  Construction of an award winning eco-friendly Visitor Centre was completed in 2007. The interpretive centre named 'Atlantic Edge' contains state of the art displays and visitor facilities. The grass-roofed building is cleverly set into the hillside - a unique cave-like structure which minimises the visual impact on this fabulously scenic location. 


Killarney, County Kerry

Accommodation

Arbutus Hotel - Killarney, County Kerry

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Enroute Sightseeing

Bunratty, County Clare

On the Map: Bunratty is located in the west of Ireland in County Clare. The main N18/M18 road connecting the cities of Limerick (to the south) & Ennis (to the north) passes right by the village. Shannon Airport is only 15 minutes to the west, also accessed via the N18/M18.

In Bunratty Village, one can enjoy the medieval grandeur that awaits in Bunratty Castle and its lively Folk Park. The castle, overlooking the River Shannon, is in excellent condition and well worth a visit. It is one of the finest surviving examples of an Irish tower house, and it's current peaceful and picturesque state belies its bloody and violent history. The strategic location of the castle on the river Shannon ensured it was the focal point of many battles, and it has it has been destroyed and re-built on at least eight occasions. The Folk Park adjoins the castle and vividly portrays what everyday life was like in rural Ireland about 100 years ago. It contains reconstructed farmhouses, cottages and shops, replete with authentic furnishings. The Park is a living museum: animals are tended, bread is baked, milk is churned, walls are whitewashed and roofs are thatched. You may visit an Irish farmhouse, watch the blacksmith fit a horseshoe, or attend a weaving demonstration. The village also reflects the fundamental changes that led to increased mobility in Irish society. Once you've explored the Castle & Folk Park, be sure to sample a relaxing cup of tea and freshly baked scones in one of the quaint thatched cottage cafes. The famous Durty Nelly's pub is in the heart of town, adjacent to the castle.


Enroute Sightseeing

Adare Heritage Village, County Limerick

On the Map: Adare is located just 20km southwest of Limerick City / 43km south of Shannon Airport. The main N21 road (connecting the cities of Limerick & Tralee/Killarney) passes right through the centre of the village.

Adare is a quaint picturesque place, lined with traditional thatched-roof cottages. Snuggled in a wooded and lush countryside setting, Adare is widely regarded as being Ireland's prettiest and most unique village. Situated on the river Maigue, a tributary of the Shannon river, Adare (Gaelic name: "Ath Dara" - the "ford of the oak" - from the combination of water and woodland) dates back, at least, to the early 13th century. Adare village has a rich wealth of heritage, as well as architectural and scenic beauty. Two groups of world famous, ornate, thatched cottages line part of the village's broad main street, punctuated with beautiful stone buildings, medieval monasteries and ruins. Situated in the centre of County Limerick, with just 15 minutes from Limerick City and 45 minutes from Shannon Airport, Adare Village is an ideal base from which to explore County Limerick's many visitor attractions such as Lough Gur and King John's Castle.


Enroute Sightseeing

Poulnabrone Dolmen and Stone Fort, County Clare

On The Map: Poulnabrone Dolmen & Caherconnell Stone Fort are less than 1 kilometre apart, in the dramatic limestone Burren Region of County Clare, in the west of Ireland. Both sites are located just off the R480 road, which connects the towns of Corofin (to the south) and Ballyvaughan (to the north).

Poulnabrone Dolmen (pictured) is a Portal Tomb, and one of the most famous megalithic monuments in Ireland, mainly due to its memorable shape and easy access from the road. The thin capstone sits on two 1.8m (6ft) high portal stones to create a chamber in a 9m (30ft) low cairn. The site was excavated in 1986 and the human remains of more than 20 adults and children, plus other artefacts were discovered. Examination of these items allowed archaelogists to date the tomb to approx 3000 B.C. Just how the people of the time managed to get the truly massive capstone in place is unknown. Just 1 kilometre south of the dolmen, lies the impressive Caherconnell Stone Fort. Caherconnell is almost a perfect circle, and 140-145 feet in external diameter. It's walls are 12 feet thick and from 6-14 feet high, and it is an exceptionally well preserved example of stone ring-fort. The fort is in its original state, and its location, overlooking virtually all-surrounding areas, suggests a defensive settlement. This may not have been defensive in a modern military sense, but more for personal security from wild animals and raiders. Ringforts such as Caherconnell are thought to have been inhabited from 400-1200A.D.


Overnight Location

Killarney, County Kerry

On the Map: Killarney is located in County Kerry in the southwest of Ireland. The town is reached via the N22 from Tralee/ Limerick (to the north) and the N22 from Cork City (to the southeast).

Killarney lies on the edge of the astoundingly beautiful Killarney National Park, with its three magnificent lakes and the spectacular MacGillycuddy Reeks mountain range. The park is also home to Muckross House and Gardens. Killarney is a wonderful base for all manner of activities including angling and water sports, golf, riding, orienteering, hiking, cycling, and canoeing. The town itself is quite small but full of charm - this you will soon see as you walk down the brick footpaths and pass curious old-style shop fronts. Killarney is well known for its excellent shops, restaurants and cosmopolitan appeal. It is also renowned for its evening entertainment including many singing pubs, cabarets, dancing venues, and banquets. Traditional Irish music can also be heard in many of the local pubs on a nightly basis.


Killarney, County Kerry

Accommodation

Arbutus Hotel - Killarney, County Kerry

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Included Experiences

Irish Whiskey Experience - Chocolate Pairing

Killarney, County Kerry

On the Golden Ticket Tour at the Irish Whiskey Experience Killarney, you will get the chance to sample several delectable Irish whiskeys and chocolates, compare and contrast the unique flavour profile of each, learn how to combine the two delicious ingredients, take a sensory perception quiz, and at the end, keep your own crystal tasting glass as a souvenir! 


Must-See Sites

Killarney to Kenmare, County Kerry

We appreciate that your time in Ireland is precious, and you simply won't be able to do absolutely everything. Completing the 110 mile Ring of Kerry, for example, might be a stretch on this tour. We do however highly recommend that you at least drive the section from Killarney to Kenmare (or vice-versa), which forms a portion of the Ring. It's only 30 kilometres/ 30 minutes each way on a narrow, winding road, but you are scenically rewarded at almost every turn. Highlights include 'Ladies View', so named for the excitement the vista illicited from Queen Victoria's Ladies-in-Waiting, during her famous 1861 visit. There's a little cafe and plenty of spots to pull in and admire the view that so stimulated the Royal Entourage 150 years ago! A little further along the road, you'll arrive at Moll's Gap. Set high on a rocky ridge, The Gap overlooks mountains, rivers, lush countryside and the famous Lakes of Killarney, with truly breathtaking views - Carrauntoohill, Ireland's highest mountain to one side, the Gap of Dunloe to the other. There's also an Avoca Store & Cafe at The Gap, selling the finest of Irish goods and souvenirs.


Kenmare, County Kerry

On the Map: Kenmare is located in scenic County Kerry in the southwest of Ireland. The town is accessed via the scenic N71 road that connects the cities of Killarney (to the north) & Glengarriff (to the south).

Kenmare, with its pastel coloured houses, is along with Killarney, a usual starting point for the Ring of Kerry round trip. The small charming town, founded by a handful of Englishmen in 1670, has every tourist convenience imaginable, including 2 of the most luxurious hotels in Ireland, both of which have been awarded much coveted Michelin stars: The Park Hotel and Sheen Falls Lodge. Kenmare boasts a remarkable number of excellent restaurants and quality pubs for a town of its size, and has garnered a fantastic reputation as a gourmet destination in recent years. Owing to its enviable location adjacent to Kenmare Bay and the River Finnehy, all set against the backdrop of the Kerry Mountains, Kenmare's picturesque aspect is hard to match.


Killarney National Park, County Kerry

On the Map: Killarney is located in County Kerry in the southwest of Ireland. The town is reached via the N22 from Tralee/ Limerick (to the north) and the N22 from Cork City (to the southeast).

On the southwestern edge of Killarney Town lies an untamed, rugged & mountainous country. The area includes the McGillycuddy's Reeks, Ireland's highest mountain range. At the foot of these mountains nestle the world famous lakes of Killarney. Here, where the mountains sweep down to the lake shores, their lower slopes covered in woodlands, you'll discover the 26,000 acre Killarney National Park . The distinctive combination of mountains, lakes, woods and waterfalls under ever changing skies, lends the area a special scenic beauty. The Park contains many features of national and international importance such as the native oakwoods and yew woods, together with an abundance of evergreen trees and shrubs. A profusion of bryophytes and lichens thrive in the mild Killarney climate. The native red deer are unique in Ireland, with a presence in the country since the last Ice Age. At the heart of the National Park is Muckross House and Gardens. The house, a late 19th century mansion features period furnishings and artefacts and is a major visitor attraction in itself. Killarney National Park was designated as a Biosphere Reserve in 1981 by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO).


Ross Castle, County Kerry

On The Map: Ross Castle is located on the southern outskirts of Killarney, County Kerry in the southwest of Ireland. From Killarney town centre, head south on the N71/Muckross Road for Kenmare. Ross Road is right turn off the N71, and is well signposted.

Ross castle overlooks the Lower Lake in Killarney, and commands magnificent views of Purple Mountain, Innisfallen Island & Ross Island. The Castle is a typical example of an Irish Chieftain stronghold during the Middle Ages. The date of its foundation is uncertain, but construction was most likely completed in the late 15th century, by one of the O'Donoghue Ross chieftains. The castle is surrounded by a fortified bawn, and its curtain walls defended by circular flanking towers, two of which remain. Ross was the last Munster stronghold to hold out against Oliver Cromwell's infamous British forces, before eventually being taken by General Ludlow in 1652. The castle contains an impressive collection of 16th & 17th century oak furniture. Legend has it that Brian Boru, Ireland's most famous High King was educated on the site of the castle by the Monks in the 9th Century. Please note that this is a very popular attraction, and visitors may experience a delay entering the castle during the busy summer months.


Killarney, County Kerry

Accommodation

Arbutus Hotel - Killarney, County Kerry

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Must-See Sites

Slea Head, County Kerry

On The Map: Slea Head is located on the Dingle Peninsula in the south west of Ireland. From Dingle town, head west on the R559 that encircles Slea Head and eventually returns to Dingle.

The Slea Head Drive is a circular route, beginning and ending in Dingle, that takes in a large number of ancient & megalithic attractions as well as offering stunning views on the western end of the peninsula. The route is clearly labelled by road signs throughout its length. To properly enjoy the Drive, a half-day should be set aside for the journey. The route is suitable for motorists, but is also ideal for cyclists: it is possible to hire a bike at a number of locations in Dingle.


Conor Pass, County Kerry

On the Map: The Conor Pass is located just northeast of Dingle town on the Spa Road.

The Conor Pass is the highest mountain pass in Ireland, and provides the most dramatic and scenic way of entering or leaving Dingle. This narrow, twisting road runs between the town of Dingle and Kilmore Cross on the north side of the peninsula, where roads fork to Cloghane/Brandon or Castlegregory. The views from the road are breathtaking, as the glaciated landscape of mountains and corrie lakes comes into view. From the scenic carpark at the summit there are views as far as the Aran Islands, located off the coast of County Galway


Dingle, County Kerry

On the Map: Dingle is located in County Kerry on the beautiful southwest coast of Ireland. The town is most easily accessible via the N86 road from Tralee, a major town 50 minutes/ 50km to the east.

The residents of Dingle, or An Daingean as it is now officially known, are the envy of everyone in Ireland. They live in what many agree is the most beautiful part in the country, in a strikingly attractive fishing village with fantastic pubs, rousing music, great restaurants and more characters per head of population than anywhere in the world. The key to Dingle is to visit as many pubs as you can while there. Seek out the old pubs frequented by the locals, sit up to the bar, order a drink and prepare to be entertained! The Dingle Peninsula on which the town is located is littered with ancient archeological sites including stone forts and many beehive huts. Scenically, the Peninsula is an absolute delight with every turn of the road revealing more of the achingly beautiful landscape. One highlight is the Slea Head loop drive from Dingle which is easily driven in an hour or cycled in an afternoon. For the energetic, a day spent climbing Mount Brandon, the peninsula's highest, will be richly rewarded. The views from the top on a clear day are absolutely stunning.


Kilkenny, County Kilkenny

Accommodation

The Pembroke Hotel - Kilkenny, County Kilkenny

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Enroute Sightseeing

Glen of Aherlow, County Tipperary

On the Map: The Glen of Aherlow is located in County Tipperary in the southern midlands of Ireland. It stretches from the N24 road, just south of the heritage town of Tipperary, through sixteen miles of unspoilt countryside.

The Glen of Aherlow is a quiet country valley, secluded but not isolated, and affords some of the most breathtaking scenery imaginable. The Glen sits between the Galtee mountains on the south and the Slievenamuck Ridge on the North. The Galtees, Ireland's highest inland mountain range, boast five spectacular corrie lakes, dominated by a variety of magnificent peaks including Galteemore at 3,018 ft. This expansive vista is further enhanced by the many streams cascading down the face of the mountain. The foothills are forested, as is the 12 miles of the Slievenamuck ridge, providing the walker with a variety of delightful woodland trails.


Enroute Sightseeing

Rock of Cashel, County Tipperary

On the Map: Cashel is located in County Tipperary in the southern midlands of Ireland. The main M8 motorway connecting the major cities of Dublin (to the northeast) and Cork (to the southwest) passes right by the town.

The Rock of Cashel (Carraig Phádraig), more formally St. Patrick's Rock, is also known as Cashel of the Kings. One of the most visited sites in Ireland, The Rock is a spectacular group of medieval buildings set on a rocky outcrop of limestone, looming above the town of Cashel, County Tipperary. There is a 12th Century round tower, High Cross and Romanesque Chapel, 13th century Gothic cathedral, 15th century castle and the Hall of the Vicars. Long before the Norman invasion The Rock of Cashel was the seat of the High Kings of Munster, although there is little structural evidence of their time here. Most of the buildings on the current site date from the 12th and 13th centuries when the rock was gifted to the Church. The buildings represent both Hiberno-Romanesque and Germanic influences in their architecture. The complex has a character of its own, unique and native, and is one of the most remarkable collections of Celtic art and medieval architecture to be found anywhere in Europe.


Overnight Location

Kilkenny, County Kilkenny

On the Map: Kilkenny City is located in County Kilkenny, in the southeast midlands of Ireland. Kilkenny is well-served by a good network of roads - the M9/N10 from Dublin (to the northeast) and N9/N10 from Waterford City (to the south).

Kilkenny, or the Marble City as it is known, is one of Ireland's oldest towns, and proud of it. Its array of ancient buildings is unrivalled. It is renowned for being a vibrant cultural center, devoted to the musical and visual arts. Its two most impressive landmarks are Kilkenny Castle, founded in 1172 and privately owned until 1967, and St. Canice's Cathedral. The current structure of the cathedral dates from the 13th century, though this is nowhere near the beginning of its story, which is rich in folklore and legend. There is no shortage of pubs to explore and enjoy in Kilkenny and during the summer the city is always full of life. The summer also sees the city host an Arts Festival and a very highly regarded Comedy Festival called the Cat Laughs.


Must-See Sites

Kilkenny Castle, County Kilkenny

On The Map: Kilkenny Castle is situated in the heart of mediaeval Kilkenny City, in the southeast midlands of Ireland.

Kilkenny Castle stands dramatically on a strategic height, commanding a crossing of the River Nore and dominating the 'High Town' of Kilkenny City. Over the eight centuries of its existence, many additions and alterations have been made to the fabric of the building, making Kilkenny Castle today a complex structure of various architectural styles. The original castle was constructed in the early 13th century for the 4th Earl of Pembroke. The Castle later became the principal Irish residence of the powerful Butler family, and remained so for almost 600 years from 1391 to 1967. The Butler ownership ended when Arthur, 6th Marquess of Ormonde (1893-1971), presented it to the people of Kilkenny in return for a token payment of £50. Due to major restoration works, the central block now includes a library, drawing room, and bedrooms decorated in 1830's splendour, as well as the beautiful Long Gallery. A suite of former servant's rooms is the Butler Art Gallery, which mounts frequently changing exhibitions of contemporary art.  The Parade Tower is the Castle's conference venue.


Leixlip, County Kildare

Accommodation

Leixlip Manor - Leixlip, County Kildare

Manor
Room Type: Manor Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time: 2 PM

Check-out time: 12 PM 


Enroute Sightseeing

Glendalough, County Wicklow

On the Map: Glendalough is located in County Wicklow, in the east of Ireland - just 1 hour south of Dublin City. Scenically nestled in the Wicklow Mountains, Glendalough is served by a network of small country roads. From the northeast (Dublin), travel on the R755/R756, from everywhere else, arrive from the west on the R756.

Glendalough ("The Glen of the Two Lakes"), is the site upon which St. Kevin founded a unique monastic settlement in the 6th century. Most of what remains of the settlement is in ruins but the Round Tower at Glendalough, built as a refuge from marauding Vikings, is over a 1000 years old and is remarkably well preserved. The site itself is set next to two clear water lakes beneath the sheer cliffs of a deep glacial valley. It is one of the most serene and beautiful places in all Ireland and it is easy to see why the monks picked it for a place of prayer and contemplation. There are a myriad of walking trails throughout the area making it a truly invigorating place to spend the day.


Enroute Sightseeing

Avoca Village, County Wicklow

On the Map: Nestled in the heart of the Wicklow Mountains, Avoca is reached via a network of country roads. 1 hour/ 66km south of Dublin City in eastern Ireland, Avoca is most easily accessed from the N11 road that runs parallel to Ireland's east coast.

In Avoca Village, you will find the "Meeting of the Waters" - the point at which the Avonmore and Avonbeg Rivers come together to form the Avoca River. Avoca is home to Ireland's oldest woollen mill, Avoca Handweavers, established in 1723. This family-owned craft design company began at the Old Mill where weavers produced the beautifully woven fabrics which became Avoca's hallmark. In recent years, Avoca became famous for being the setting of the popular BBC soap opera "Ballykissangel".


Enroute Sightseeing

Powerscourt House and Gardens, County Wicklow

On the Map: Powerscourt House & Gardens is located in County Wicklow in the east of Ireland. Powerscourt is accessed via the R117 road, which intersects with the main M11/N11 approx. 30 kilometres south of Dublin City.

One mile long and lined by over 2,000 beech trees, even the avenue leading to the Powerscourt House echoes the magnificence of the whole estate. In addition the 47 acres of gardens are remarkable for their grandeur of scale, at the same time combining great delicacy and refinement of detail. The house was gutted by fire in 1974 but recently has been reborn as an exceptional tourist destination. An exhibition brings to life the rich history of the estate, while the double height Georgian ballroom has been restored and hosts weddings and corporate events. The house is now home to the best of Irish design in gifts, clothes, and furniture in the Avoca Stores and the Interiors Gallery. You can also treat yourself to a dish from the Avoca Cookbook in the Terrace Cafe. Or you can visit the Powerscourt Distillery onsite as well.  The gardens at Powerscourt, recently voted Number 3 in the entire world by National Geographic, were laid out in two main periods. When the house was rebuilt in the decade after 1731, the surrounding grounds were also remodelled. The design reflected the desire to create a garden which was part of the wider landscape. To the north formal tree plantations framed the vista from the house, while a walled garden, fish pond, cascades, grottos and terraces lay to the south. Walks wound through the wooded grounds and a fine tree-lined avenue was created.


Overnight Location

Leixlip, County Kildare

On the map: The name "Leixlip" comes from the Old Norse Lax Hlaup which means "salmon leap". The was the name given to the area by Vikings when they established a settlement near the confluence of the river Liffey and Rye Water in the 9th century. The salmon leap itself was a pair of large waterfalls which are now gone from view following the installation of a hydroelectric power station in the mid-1940s.

After the Vikings, the Normans arrived and built a Castle overlooking the two rivers in 1132 known as Leixlip Castle. In 1732, the nephew of Speaker Connolly, William Connolly, bought the castle, and in the same year, Arthur Guinness began a small brewery on the banks of the Liffey beside the Main Street. The brewery moved to St. James’s Gate, Dublin in 1759 and has become one of the best- known global brands.

Thomas Connolly’s wife, Lady Louise, was responsible for the building of The Obelisk between Leixlip & Celbridge known as Connolly’s Folly, in 1740 and the Wonderful Barn, built in 1743.


Depart From

Depart from Dublin Airport, County Dublin

Return to Dublin Airport at least two hours prior to your flight's scheduled departure. This will allow ample time to check in for your flight home.

After check-in and passenger security, browse the array of shops on offer at 'The Loop' in Dublin Airport. With an extensive range of stores, bars and cafes, any spare time you have will fly!


LOW SEASON
Jan - Mar | Nov - Dec
From $2,843 per person
MID SEASON
Apr - May | Sep - Oct
From $2,880 per person
HIGH SEASON
June - August
From $3,444 per person

Your Price Includes

ACCOMMODATION

  • 12-nights of 4 & 5-star hotels, Unique Irish Manor Houses, and Authentic Irish B&B

TRANSPORTATION

  • Rental Car including our Exclusive Reduced Excess Insurance Package

DINING OPTIONS

  • 14 Full Irish Breakfasts

UNIQUE EXPERIENCES

  • Dublin 'Hop-On, Hop-Off' 2-Day Sightseeing Double-Decker Bus Pass
  • Guinness Connoisseur Experience
  • Food Folk & Fairies
  • Dublin Vintage Tea Tour
  • Mount Falcon Hawk Walk
  • Irish Whiskey Experience and Chocolate pairing.

POINTS OF INTERESTS

  • Belfast City & The Titanic Exhibit
  • The Giant's Causeway & The Glens of Antrim
  • The Connemara National Park & Kylemore Abbey
  • The Cliffs of Moher & Burren Region along the Wild Atlantic Way
  • The Rock of Cashel & Glendalough
  • The Guinness Storehouse
  • Trinity College & The Book of Kells
  • St. Patrick's Cathedral & Dublin Castle
  • The Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge & Dunluce Castle
  • Slieve League & Glenveagh National Park
  • Glencar Waterfall
  • Croagh Patrick & Achill Island 
  • Killarney National Park & Ross Castle
  • The Ring of Kerry and the Dingle Peninsula

Prices Based On

  • All Taxes & Fees Included
  • Prices are Per Person based on 2 people traveling together and sharing a room.
  • Traveling Alone? No Problem. Just Ask Us for a Single Supplement Price.

Destination Vacation

byPeter L PavlinaAuthentic Ireland Travel
Your Hometown: Boston

Great trip thanks to Michelle's great work!

Ireland Vacation

byJessica BrewerAuthentic Ireland Travel
Your Hometown: St. Cloud

We had a FABULOUS vacation! Jacoya was great to work with. Highly recommend!

Dream Vacation!

Your Hometown: Coronado

Our trip to Ireland was an absolute dream! Thank you, Tam, for taking the time to create a personalized, affordable trip for us. I highly suggest using Tam at Authentic Vacations to plan your trip to Ireland! You will have the time of your life! :)

Great Vacation. Fabulous Vacation Planner

Your Hometown: Palo Alto, CA

I cannot speak highly enough about the vacation planning services we received from Amanda. With only 8 days lead time before we were to get on a plane, Amanda arranged a 9 day vacation that will long be remembered. She was patient, kind and had a wonderful sense of humor that remained in place even as I constantly changed parameters on her. I would not hesitate to use Amanda or Authentic Ireland Vacations. I will certainly do so in the future.

Beautiful Ireland

byGwendolyn A GodfreyAuthentic Ireland Travel
Your Hometown: Zephyrhills

We worked with Lauren who arranged a fabulous Ireland trip for us and every detail was taken care of from start to finish. The hotels were wonderful and the Irish people are the very best. Don't hesitate to contact Lauren to plan your Irish vacation, you'll more more than satisfied.

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