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10-Night Wild Authentic Ireland

Price: From $1,998 Per Person 10 Nights

For a limited time, save $500 per couple on this tour with code: WILD.
Hurry, must book by 12/31!

Spend a fascinating 10 nights exploring the many wonders of Ireland's northern half, on our Wild Authentic Ireland Tour. Your trip encompasses everything that makes Ireland such a diverse, captivating and unique country to visit. Discover highlights of the famous Wild Atlantic Way, including Westport Town on Clew Bay, Clifden's Sky Road, Keem Strand on Achill Island, Surfing Mecca Mullaghmore, Killybegs Fishing Village, the towering seacliffs of Slieve League, and Malin Head on the stunning Inishowen Peninsula. Spend 3 nights in Northern Ireland, visiting spectacular locations such as UNESCO Giant's Causeway, Dunluce Castle, Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, Titanic Belfast, the Glens of Antrim and the Mourne Coastal Route. While sojourning in Northern Ireland, you'll also have the opportunity to check-out a variety of filming locations for HBO's wildly popular Game of Thrones TV series. Complete your tour surrounded by the legends and history of Ireland's Ancient East - The Land of 5,000 Dawns. Here, a multitude of enthralling ancient monuments will be revealed, all located on the doorstep of your overnight Boyne Valley accommodation. Your tour also comprises a 1 night stay in Dublin City, as well as including a bounty of unique experiences, activities and visitor attraction admissions.

                             **Use tabs above to view Itinerary, Prices & How to Book.**

Tour Highlights

ACCOMMODATION

  • 3 Nights in Alluring Irish Castles
  • 5 Nights at Elegant & Historic Country Estates
  • 2 Nights in Boutique 4-Star Hotels

TRANSPORTATION

  • Meet & Greet Private Transfer Service from Dublin Airport
  • Rental Car including our Exclusive Reduced Excess Insurance Package

DINING OPTIONS

  • 10 Sumptuous Full Irish Breakfasts

UNIQUE EXPERIENCES

  • Visit & Explore UNESCO Giant's Causeway
  • Unveil the Compelling Story of the Doomed Liner at Titanic Belfast

INCLUDED ENTRANCES & ADMISSIONS

  • The Book of Kells at Trinity College
  • 6th Century Monastic Site at Clonmacnoise
  • Kylemore Abbey & Victorian Walled Garden
  • Glenveagh National Park & Castle
  • Stunning Dunluce Castle
  • 12th Century Trim Castle

Dublin, County Dublin

Accommodation

Trinity City Hotel - More Info - Dublin, County Dublin

4 Star
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon. 


Included Experiences

Meet & Greet Private Airport Transfer - Dublin

Dublin, County Dublin

Your tour includes a luxurious private transfer from Dublin Airport to your Downtown Hotel. Once you have collected your luggage, proceed through to the Arrivals Hall, and look for your driver. He/She will be holding an iPad with your name thereon, and will quickly escort you outside, where your ride awaits. Before you know it, you will have arrived at your Dublin City Center Hotel, and your Irish adventure can truly begin! That's right, no endless searching for the right airport shuttle, bus or taxi. No trying to figure out where you're going or which bus stop is yours. Just the perfect start to a well-deserved, relaxing vacation... All part of our Authentic Vacations 5-star Customer Service!


Book of Kells at Trinity College

Dublin, County Dublin

Time spent in Dublin would not be complete without a visit to Trinity College. Founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1st, it is one of the oldest universities in the British Isles, and the very oldest in Ireland. Standing on a self contained site in the very heart of Dublin, the College itself covers some 35 acres of cobbled squares and green spaces surrounded by buildings which represent the accumulated architectural riches of nearly three centuries. Although Trinity offers much of interest to the visitor, the crown jewel is without doubt the Book of Kells. The Book is an 'illuminated manuscript', globally celebrated for its lavish decoration. The manuscript contains the four Gospels in Latin based on a Vulgate text, written on vellum (prepared calfskin), in a bold and expert version of the script known as 'insular majuscule'. Written in the 9th century, it has been on display in the famous Old Library at Trinity College Dublin from the mid-19th century, and attracts over 500,000 visitors a year. Two volumes are on public view, one opened to display a major decorated page, and one to show two pages of script. The volumes are changed at regular intervals. Your ticket includes entrance to The Old Library and The Book of Kells - just present your Authentic Ireland voucher on arrival.


Overnight Location

Dublin, County Dublin

On the Map: Dublin, Ireland's Capital City is located on the east coast of the country, and is well served by infrastructure linking it to all parts of the Emerald Isle.

Dublin is a lively cosmopolitan city brimming with culture. You could spend your time strolling the streets soaking up the atmosphere, relaxing in its cafes and bars or you could check out its myriad historical, literary and cultural delights. The 8th century illuminated manuscript, the Book of Kells, must be viewed. It is on display at the impressive Trinity College, Ireland's first university (founded 1592) in the heart of Dublin. For the rest of your time, it is up to you how much you want to pack in. Phoenix Park (twice the size of New York City's Central Park), Georgian Dublin around Stephen's Green, Dublin Castle, the National Botanical Gardens, National Museum, Kilmainham Gaol and the Hugh Lane Municipal Art Gallery are all highly recommended stops on your tour. Then there's the Guinness Storehouse and Jameson Distillery.  A visit to Dublin's Temple Bar to experience the lively Dublin pub culture is a must, though many of Dublin's best bars can be found outside this area in the streets and laneways around Grafton Street, the shopper's street of choice. Purchasing a 'hop-on, hop-off' Dublin Bus Tour ticket is a great way to get around and see all the major sites at a very reasonable cost.


Must-See Sites

Dublin Museums, County Dublin

Dublin has long been recognized as a center of art & culture. The city is literally awash with interesting museums and galleries of all types and sizes.
It's impossible to make note of them all, but three of the best are:
The Chester Beatty Library: Alfred Chester Beatty, a New Yorker donated a fantastic collection of books to the city of Dublin. Highlights include papyrus scripts, valuable copies of the Koran, Buddhist & Far Eastern literature, as well as early mediaeval manuscripts.
National Museum of Ireland - Archaeology: Enter this museum and be transported back in time to almost 7000BC! Gold and other treasures recount a varied Irish history through Christian and pre-Christian times. A range of exhibitions also present artifacts from many other cultures and regions.
National Gallery: Here you can admire European works of art from the late Middle Ages to the end of the 19th century. As well as Irish artists, the Gallery also boasts works by Angelico, Goya, Gainsborough & Reynolds, to name but a few.


Temple Bar, County Dublin

On The Map: Temple Bar lies in the heart of Dublin City. Located on the south bank of the River Liffey, and just west of Trinity College and Grafton Street.

The lively and vibrant Temple Bar District - Dublin's Cultural Quarter, is well worth a visit. Temple Bar has preserved its medieval street pattern, with many narrow cobbled streets, and is home to many cultural organizations, such as the Irish Film Centre & Project Arts Centre. There is a great array of small galleries and stores to choose from, but Temple Bar is probably best known for being Dublin's major nightlife centre. The area comes alive after dark, with many pubs, restaurants and nightclubs to choose from. Temple Bar may not be for everyone, but can never be described as boring!


Grafton Street, County Dublin

On The Map: Grafton Street runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south to College Green in the north

Grafton Street is without doubt Ireland's premier shopping street - in terms of retail rent, it's the fifth most expensive in the world! With beautiful historic buildings housing iconic Irish businesses such as Brown Thomas, Weir & Sons and Bewley’s Grafton Street Café, Grafton Street offers an experience that cannot be found elsewhere in the country. Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianized, with the exception of a short stretch that runs between Nassau Street and College Green and contains the 18th century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. If shopping's not your thing, Grafton Street is still worth checking out. It's a bustling, atmospheric spot, and high quality street performers including musicians, poets and mime-artists commonly perform to the shopping crowds.


Connemara, County Galway

Accommodation

Abbeyglen Castle - More Info - Connemara, County Galway

Castle
Room Type: Superior Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 3:30pm, check-out is before 12:00 noon. Hotel will try and accommodate alternative times, just call on 095 21201.


Included Experiences

Clonmacnoise

Clonmacnoise, County Offaly

The ancient monastic site of Clonmacnoise is situated at the crossroads of Ireland in County Offaly and dates back almost 1,500 years. St. Ciaran, the son of an Ulsterman who had settled in Connaught, chose the site in 545 AD because of its ideal location at the junction of river and road travel in Celtic Ireland. The location borders the three provinces of Connaught, Munster and Leinster. The monastery is on the east side of the River Shannon, in what was then the Kingdom of Meath, but occupying a position so central it was the burial-place of many of the kings of Connaught as well as those of Tara. The site includes the ruins of a cathedral, seven churches (10th  -13th century), two round towers, three high crosses and the largest collection of Early Christian grave-slabs in Western Europe. The original high crosses and a selection of grave-slabs are on display in the visitor centre. The long and varied history of Clonmacnoise is recounted in an audiovisual presentation shown in the visitor centre. There are also exhibitions that are dedicated to the flora, fauna and landscape of the region. Use your included admission voucher ot visit anytime today.


Enroute Sightseeing

Quay Street, County Galway

Galway's Quay Street is a bustling & interesting place for a stroll at any time - day or night. The street is narrow, charming, pedestrianized, and quite often thronged with shoppers, tourists and walkers. One of Galway's best-loved areas, Quay Street has something for everyone - from upmarket Boutiques to traditional Fish n' Chip shops. A variety of great pubs and restaurants abound, and you'll nearly always find Street Performers & Musicians plying their trade. Dillons Claddagh Gold on Quay Street are the original makers of the famous Claddagh Ring and are also Ireland's oldest jewelers, established in 1750. Bear left along the river at the end of Quay Street to view the Spanish Arch, constructed by Conquistadores in the 1500s. Overlooking the Arch, you'll find the Galway City Museum. This small but very interesting museum is packed with historical exhibits, and it's free!


Enroute Sightseeing

Galway, County Galway

On the Map: Galway is a coastal city, located in County Galway in the west of Ireland. Galway is well-served by a good network of roads - the M6/N6 from Dublin (to the east) and M18/N18 from Limerick & Cork (to the south).

In a recent nationwide survey the people of Galway were found to be Ireland's happiest! And visiting Galway City, the capital of their county it is not hard to see why. It is a lively university city of narrow streets, quaint shopfronts, bustling pubs and stunning surrounding scenery. It has always attracted a bohemian mix of musicians, artists and intellectuals and that attitude is palpable as you walk the streets. Galway has been commercially important since the 11th century when it was a centre for trade with Spain and Portugal. In 1477 Christopher Columbus paid a visit. Galway earned the title “City of the Tribes” around that time, when it was ruled by 14 wealthy merchant families. Today it is lively, with loads of things to do, and is so popular that it can get very crowded in summer, especially during the annual Galway Races. The annual Arts Festival also attracts thousands, especially for its street parade, organized by the multi-award winning production company, Macnas. Its famous Druid Theatre produces and stages plays and has toured internationally, winning awards, including Tonys on Broadway.


Overnight Location

Connemara, County Galway

On the Map: Connemara encompasses a large area northwest of Galway City in the west of Ireland. It is most easily accessed via the N59 road that loops around the region and connects the cities of Galway (to the southeast) & Westport (to the northeast).

Northwest of Galway lies the rocky, barren, but breathtakingly stunning region of Connemara. This area is one of the few remaining in Ireland where the native tongue (Gaeilge) is still fluently spoken as a first language. Stop off in the fishing village of Roundstone, where currachs, old style featherweight rowing boats are still in everyday use. The village also boasts an impressive crafts complex, selling everything from teapots and sweaters to traditional Irish music instruments. Clifden, Connemara's capital is well worth a visit and the scenic Sky Road drive just outside town should not be missed.  From here travel north to see the exquisite neo-gothic Kylemore Abbey, nestled in a lush forest on the edge of Kylemore Lake. However long you spend in Connemara you will be constantly enchanted by the ever changing scenery of mountains and valleys, lakes and beaches and bays. This is Ireland's big sky country.


Must-See Sites

Sky Road, Clifden, County Galway

On The Map: The Sky Road drive begins in Clifden Town. Clifden is located on Ireland's west coast in the Connemara Region of County Galway. Clifden is reached via the N59 road from Galway to the southeast, and Westport to the northeast.

The Sky Road is an exhilarating 11km/7ml circular drive west of Clifden Town. The Sky Road is well signposted from Clifden. You will first pass Abbeyglen Castle Hotel (on your left), and after approx 400 metres beyond the hotel, take a look back towards Clifden. The 12 Bens mountains provide a wonderful backdrop to the town, and its two church spires, complete Clifden's distinctive skyline. The scenery along the Sky Road is quite simply, stunning. As you travel, the Sky Road separates into the lower and upper roads. The lower road takes you along the shoreline, and although pleasant, the upper road is more popular, owing to the commanding views it offers over the entire area. As the upper road rises, you are treated to breathtaking island & coastline views. There is a good-sized car park at the highest point of the upper road for wonderful photo opportunities. If you continue along the Sky Road thereafter, you will eventually join the main N59 Road, a few kilometres north of Clifden.


Connemara, County Galway

Accommodation

Abbeyglen Castle - More Info - Connemara, County Galway

Castle
Room Type: Superior Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 3:30pm, check-out is before 12:00 noon. Hotel will try and accommodate alternative times, just call on 095 21201.


Included Experiences

Kylemore Abbey & Victorian Walled Garden

Connemara, County Galway

Set in the Connemara mountains is Kylemore Abbey, a beautiful neo-Gothic Castle. Given it's picture-perfect location, Kylemore is often touted as Ireland's most romantic castle. Built by the English industrialist Mitchell Henry in 1868, visitors to the three reception rooms in the Abbey are touched by its history steeped in romance and tragedy. Kylemore Castle was sold to Benedictine nuns fleeing war-torn Belgium in 1920 and the Castle became an Abbey. Mitchell Henry built the recently re-opened Neo-Gothic Church between 1877 and 1881 as a memorial to his wife following her untimely death. The Church, a ‘Cathedral in Miniature’, is a centre of reflection and prayer for many visitors. Visitors can explore the 6-acre Victorian Walled Garden with it’s magnificent restored buildings. Discover woodland walks, lakeshore walks & nature trails throughout the 1,000 acre estate. Visitors can also see the Mausoleum where the original owners are buried. In the A.V. Room, attached to the Visitor Centre, get a sense of the history of Kylemore Abbey & Garden while viewing the twelve-minute video. No need to pre-book - use your included admission voucher to visit anytime today!


Must-See Sites

Westport, County Mayo

On the Map: Westport enjoys a coastal location in County Mayo, in the west of Ireland. The town is accessed via the N59 road from Clifden (to the south), or N5 road from Castlebar (to the east).

Westport is a postcard-pretty town with as lovely a main street as you'll be likely to find anywhere in Ireland. The town lies in the shadow of Croagh Patrick with Clew Bay and its 365 islands just to the west. While in Westport be sure to visit Westport House and climb at least a little of Croagh Patrick. Westport House dates from 1730 and offers everything from a dungeon to a zoo! Croagh Patrick is a 765-meter hill where St. Patrick is said to have banished the snakes from Ireland. This hill is climbed (often barefoot) by thousands of Catholic pilgrims each July. South of Westport are some stunning scenic drives leading into the Connemara region. A trip northwards will bring you to remote Achill island which is accessible by a small bridge. Even further off the beaten path is Belmullet in the northwest corner of County Mayo. Westport also boasts a great selection of traditional pubs, among them Matt Molloy's of the Chieftains. 


Croagh Patrick, County Mayo

On The Map: Croagh Patrick is a 764 metres mountain, located just 8 kilometres southwest of Westport town in County Mayo.

Croagh Patrick is Ireland's sacred mountain, and has been since ancient times. In pre-Christian Ireland it was the focus of the harvest festival of Lughnasa, traditionally held around August 1. The mountain was especially important for women, who would sleep on the summit during Lughnasa to encourage fertility. According to Christian tradition, St. Patrick went up the sacred mountain at festival time in 441 AD. After fasting at the summit for 40 days, he banished all the snakes and demons from Ireland. The site quickly became an important place of Christian pilgrimage & a stone oratory dating from between 430 and 890 AD was recently discovered on the summit. Nowadays, as many as one million pilgrims and visitors make the trek to the top to pray at the stations of the cross, participate in Mass, do penance (in which case the rocky journey is undertaken barefoot!) or simply to enjoy the spectacular view.


Achill Island, County Mayo

On the Map: Achill Island is located off County Mayo on the west coast of Ireland. The island is accessed via land bridge from the N59 road connecting the cities of Westport & Bangor. 

Achill Island is the largest island in Ireland at 60 square miles and is accessible from the mainland by a land bridge. Here you can visit the quaint villages of Dooagh and Dooega, the high cliffs at Slievemore and Minaun and the magnificent beaches at Keel and Keem, under Achill Head. No visit to the Island would be complete without taking a journey of scenic splendour on the famous Wild Atlantic Way Drive which circuits the island. Achill's beautiful unspoiled, remote scenery and clear waters make it ideally suited to outdoor pursuits. You can explore the island's peaceful countryside with a beach walk, hill walk, or even a road walk! You can rent bicycles on the island if you would like to cover more distance. You can climb the highest mountain on the island, Mt. Slievemore (about 1800 feet), with ease and have a remarkable view of the area, or opt take a walk up the third highest point, Mt. Minaun and walk along the Minaun cliffs.


Connemara National Park, County Galway

On The Map: Connemara National park is located in County Galway in the west of Ireland. The main park entrance is close to the village of Letterfrack on the main N59 road that connects Clifden to the south, and Westport to the northeast.

Connemara National Park covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park's mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range. Connemara National Park was established and opened to the public in 1980. Much of the present Park lands formed part of the Kylemore Abbey Estate and the southern part of the Park was at one time owned by Richard 'Humanity Dick' Martin, who helped form the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals during the early 19th century. The Park has a Visitor's Centre (open March to October), that offers an audio-visual presentation about the region. 4 rewarding hiking trails begin at the centre, and a tea-room, playground and picnic area are also available. As well as its great natural beauty, many remains of human presence can be found in the Park. The oldest are megalithic court tombs some 4,000 years old. There is also an early 19th century graveyard about which little is known. Ruined houses, a disused lime kiln, old sheep pens, an ice house, drainage systems and old walls in various parts of the Park, are all evidence of a greater population and more extensive use of these lands in the past.


Donegal, County Donegal

Accommodation

Harvey's Point - More Info - Donegal, County Donegal

4 Star
Room Type: Executive Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 4:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out is before 11.30am.


Enroute Sightseeing

Drumcliff & W.B Yeats, County Sligo

On The Map: Drumcliff is located just 8 kilomeotres north of Sligo Town, along the N15 Road.

Drumcliff is the final resting place of famous Irish poet William Butler Yeats (1865–1939), who is buried in the graveyard of St. Columba's Church of Ireland church. Although Yeats died in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France in January 1939, his remains were brought home to Ireland by the Irish Naval Service and re-interred at Drumcliff in 1948. Yeats' epitaph reads: "Cast a cold eye, On life on death, Horseman, pass by". Yeats himself chose this peaceful churchyard at Drumcliffe in County Sligo as his final resting place, with it’s stunning location at the foot of Benbulben mountain. The graveyard also contains the remains of a round tower and a high cross constructed in the 11th century, when there was a Christian monastery, founded by Saint Columcille in 574 AD on the site.


Enroute Sightseeing

Glencar Waterfall, County Leitrim

On The Map: Glencar Waterfall lies about 8 miles north of Sligo town, and 5 miles west of Manorhamilton, just off the N16 road that connects the two towns.

With a drop of approx. 50 feet, Glencar Waterfall is not the largest in the world. It does however occupy a wonderfully scenic and romantic location, and is particularly impressive after rain. The setting and charm of the waterfall inspired Ireland's famous poetic son, W.B Yeats, and is mentioned in his poem, 'The Stolen Child'. The falls are accessed via a lovely wooded walk and on-site picnic facilities are provided. There are more waterfalls visible from the road, but none are quite as romantic as this one! The waterfall is adjacent to serene Glencar Lake on the Sligo / Leitrim border - a most enchanting area.


Enroute Sightseeing

Ben Bulben, County Sligo

Benbulben is known as County Sligo’s 'Table Mountain' and is part of the Dartry Mountains. Benbulben was formed as a result of the different responses to erosion of the limestone and shale of which the mountain is formed. A hard and resistant limestone forms the upper cliffs and precipices. Benbulben was formed during the Ice age, when large parts of the Earth were under glaciers. It was originally merely a large ridge, however the moving glaciers cut into the earth, leaving a distinct formation, now called Benbulben.


Enroute Sightseeing

Mullaghmore, County Sligo

On The Map: Mullaghmore Village is located on Ireland's west coast in County Sligo, 25 kilometres north of Sligo Town.

Mullaghmore Village & Mullaghmore Head are popular holiday destinations in Ireland. The area boasts a beautiful and expansive sandy beach, with the unique shape of Benbulben Mountain providing the perfect scenic backdrop. Construction of nearby Classiebawn Castle (pictured) was completed in 1874. The distinctive Baronial Manor was built for Henry John Temple, a.k.a. Lord Palmerstown, though he died several years before its completion. In recent years, Mullaghmore has become a globally-renowned destination for surfers. In March 2012, a 49-foot high wave was recorded, and trhe swells were greatly enjoyed by surfers and windsurfers from all over the world.


Overnight Location

Donegal, County Donegal

On the Map: Donegal town is located in County Donegal in the northwest of Ireland. The N15 road connecting the cities of Sligo (to the southwest) and Derry (to the northwest) passes-by just east of the town.

Donegal Town is famous for being the former home to the O'Donnell Clan, who played a pivotal role in Irish history. From the 15th to the 17th century, they provided the main opposition to the colonisation of Ireland by England. The town itself contains Donegal castle, on the banks of the River Eske and the remains of a Franciscan abbey which dates back to the 15th century on the Southern shore of the Bay. The Annals of the Four Masters are traditionally thought to have been started in the abbey in the early 17th century. The story of Red Hugh O'Donnell, Lord of Tyrconnell, was the inspiration behind many books and films, not least, Disney's The Fighting Prince of Donegal (1966).


Donegal, County Donegal

Accommodation

Harvey's Point - More Info - Donegal, County Donegal

4 Star
Room Type: Executive Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 4:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out is before 11.30am.


Included Experiences

Glenveagh National Park

Glenveagh National Park, County Donegal

Glenveagh National Park is one of six national parks in Ireland. Situated in the Northwest of Co. Donegal, Glenveagh encompasses some 16,000 hectares in the heart of the Derryveagh Mountains. Such a great wilderness is home to many interesting plants and animals. The Glenveagh Visitor Centre is located on the northern end of Lough Veagh - its award-winning design incorporates a living heather roof. The extensive displays contained within provide an introduction to the park's natural and built history. Glenveagh Castle is a 19th century castellated mansion, that was constructed between 1867 and 1873. Its construction in a remote mountain setting was inspired by the Victorian idyll of a romantic highland retreat, and the style of earlier Irish Towerhouses was imitated, adding an air of antiquity to the castle. The forbidding architecture of the castle is quickly forgotten amidst the varied comforts within. Through time, each room acquired a different character, some roughly in keeping with the period of the house, others freely inventive. Your visit to Glenveagh includes a shuttle bus to/from the Visitor Centre to the Castle, as well as a tour of the grand old mansion.


Must-See Sites

Slieve League, County Donegal

On the Map: Slieve League is located in County Donegal on the northwest coast of Ireland. The area is accessed via the R263 road that heads west from the fishing village of Killybegs.

The Slieve League cliffs are said to be the highest and one of the finest marine cliffs in Europe. To fully enjoy the spectacle of Slieve League, it is best to leave your car at the car park and walk the few miles to the cliffs so as not to miss the exciting scenery of the area. There are terrific views of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sligo Mountains and Donegal Bay as you walk towards the exceptionally high top of Slieve League, where the cliff face of Bunglas rises over 600 metres above the raging seas below. Experienced walkers only should venture beyond the viewing point onto One Man's Pass which loops around onto the Pilgrim's Path.


Killybegs, County Donegal

On the Map: Killybegs is a County Donegal coastal town in the northwest of Ireland. The town is accessed via the N56 and R263 from Donegal town (30 minutes away to the east).

Killybegs is Ireland's premier fishing port. Located on the northwest coast of Ireland, this natural harbour provides a perfect gateway to the Atlantic Ocean. It is an excellent place to base yourself when touring the south west of Donegal. A lively fishing town with Ireland's largest fleet of trawlers. Killybegs is a bustling town where local and foreign ships tower over the quayside. With large numbers of both trendy and modern restaurants and the more traditional pubs, Killybegs offers the visitor a variety of good food, drink and entertainment.


Derry, County Derry

Accommodation

Beech Hill Country House Hotel - More Info - Derry, County Derry

Manor
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Enroute Sightseeing

Prehistoric Rock Art, Inishowen, County Donegal

Located on the Inishowen Peninsula in County Donegal, the Isle of Doagh is renowned as one of the most important prehistoric rock art locations in Western Europe. Two recent discoveries have been added to the 40+ known sites in the area, which are estimated to date from at least 3,000 BC. Most of the sites display wonderful examples of 'cup and ring' art. It is speculated that the Isle of Donagh was considered an important sacred site in prehistoric times, but the exact significance of the art is largely unknown.


Enroute Sightseeing

Grianan of Aileach, County Donegal

This restored cashel is over 23 metres in diameter with surrounding earthworks and sits atop Greenan Hill with outstanding views across Lough Swilly, Lough Foyle and the gorgeous countryside of the Inishowen Peninsula. On a clear day it is said that the view includes 5 counties. The main structure is a stone ringfort, thought to have been built in the sixth or seventh century CE. It has been identified as the seat of the Kingdom of Ailech and one of the royal sites of Gaelic Ireland. The wall is about 4.5 metres (15 ft) thick and 5 metres (16 ft) high, and inside are three terraces, which are linked by steps, and two long passages within it.

Enroute Sightseeing

Malin Head, County Donegal

On the Map: Malin Head is located on the Inishowen Peninsula, County Donegal, Ireland and is the most northerly point of the island of Ireland. The northernmost tip is the headland named Banba's Crown after the mythological patron goddess of Ireland. 

Donegal’s Malin Head is steeped in history and offers activities such as walking, fishing, swimming and bird watching. Located North of Trawbreaga Bay and home to Five Finger Strand which features some of Europe’s largest sand dunes. At low tide, you can even spot the wreckage of the ‘Twilight’, which sank in 1889 while sailing to Derry. More history follows as you traverse the coast road. You’ll pass the old radio station, built in 1910, and The Tower, a derelict signal station located on Banba’s Crown, the most northerly point in Ireland. Walk along the cliffs to Hell’s Hole, a chasm where the tide rushes in with impressive force. Ancient pieces of nature's past can be found at Ballyhillion beach, which dates back to the ice age and is known for its many semi-precious stones.


Overnight Location

Derry, County Derry

On the Map: Derry City is located close to the northern coast in Northern Ireland. Derry is accessed via the N15/N13 from Donegal (to the southwest) and the A6 from Belfast (to the southeast).

The story of Derry is a long and tumultuous one. Set on a hill on the banks of the Foyle estuary, strategically close to the open sea, it came under siege and attack for over a thousand years. You can walk along the great 17th-century walls, about a mile round and 18 feet thick, which withstood several sieges and even today are unbroken and complete, with old cannon still pointing their black noses over the ramparts. The great siege lasted for 105 days. Today, there’s an atmosphere of optimism in Derry and the city buzzes with life. It’s an artistic city, with theatres, galleries and other cultural centres and a number of annual festivals. Its people, with their gentle accent, are very welcoming.


Must-See Sites

Derry Walls Heritage Trail, County Derry

The famous Derry City Walls were built in the early part of the 17th Century. Following this other key periods in the city’s history include: The Siege of Derry, Emigration, Famine in Ireland, Shirt Industry, World War I and II, Easter Rising, Civil Rights Marches, Bloody Sunday, Ceasefires and the Good Friday Agreement. Each of these has in part contributed to the moulding of the city as it is today, with a blend of both the modern and historic; occupied by optimistic and friendly people. The Walled City heritage Trail takes in 200 sites of particular historical importance. Cathedrals, churches, parks, villages, murals and monuments all within the Derry City Council, tell of various tales in the city’s history. The historic sites are easy to find as the city and surrounding countryside have been divided up into distinct areas.


Ballymena, County Antrim

Accommodation

Galgorm Resort & Spa - More Info - Ballymena, County Antrim

4 Star
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in times are between 2pm - 6pm, please call if you will be arriving outside these hours.


Included Experiences

Dunluce Castle

Bushmills, County Antrim

Dunluce Castle is sited dramatically close to the edge of a headland, along the North Antrim coast. One could spend hours marvelling at such a wondrous feat of construction 500 years ago! Surrounded by jaw dropping coastal scenery, this medieval castle stands where an early Irish fort was once built, and its history can be traced back to early Christians and Vikings. The Castle has a rich and varied history, connected with such famous names as Richard de Burgh, Sorley Boy MacDonnell, and Sir John Perrott. Dunluce Village which once surrounded the castle was destroyed by fire during the siege of 1641, but some archaelogical remnants of walls remain. Also nearby are the ancient church ruins of St. Cuthbert's, and the site was witness to the sinking of the colony ship the Exmouth, bound for Quebec, which broke up on rocks off Islay with 240 deaths in 1847. The site features a visitor centre, shop and guided tours of the ruins, gardens and remnants of the town. No need to pre-book - use your included admission voucher to visit anytime today!


Giant's Causeway

Bushmills, County Antrim

Flanked by the wild North Atlantic Ocean and a landscape of dramatic cliffs, for centuries the Giant’s Causeway has inspired artists, stirred scientific debate and captured the imagination of all who see it. Why not experience the Giant's Causeway for yourself? Visit the world-famous basalt columns with one of our knowledgeable tour guides (for a small additional fee paid on-site), or pick up an audio guide and go at your own pace. Climb the Shepherd's Steps and hike along the cliff-top trail to get a bird's eye view of the beautiful causeway coast. Unlock the mystery and stories of the landscape in the exhibition area of our award-winning visitor centre, which also boasts a café serving a seasonal menu, and retail zone where you can pick up locally sourced souvenirs and handicrafts.


Enroute Sightseeing

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, County Antrim

On The Map: Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge is located near the small town of Ballintoy, in County Antrim Northern Ireland. The rope bridge connects the mainland to the tiny island of Carrick in the northeast corner of Northern Ireland.

Spanning a chasm some eighty feet deep is the famous Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge, it's construction once consisted of a single rope hand rail and widely spaced slats which the fishermen would traverse across with salmon caught off the island to which it leads. The single handrail was subsequently replaced by a two hand railed bridge, and the current, caged bridge was installed by the National Trust during Easter of 2000 as a further safety measure. Although no-one has ever been injured falling off the old or new bridge, there have been many instances of visitors being unable to face the return walk back across the bridge, resulting in them being taken off the island by boat, so not an activity for the faint-hearted!


Enroute Sightseeing

Larrybane Head ("Renly Baratheon's Camp"), County Antrim

On The Map: Larrybane Head is located adjacent to Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, near the small town of Ballintoy, in County Antrim Northern Ireland.
GPS Coordinates: 55.239595, -6.335038

Located along the stunning North Coast close to Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge lies Larrybane headland, which used to stretch out towards Sheep Island. Its large caves once served as a home to boat builders and a safe haven from winter storms. While in the area be sure to cross the 80 foot high Rope Bridge - not for the faint of heart!
Featured Scene:
Season 2: Larrybane was the dramatic spot chosen for Renly Baratheon's camp in Season 2. This is where Catelyn Stark agrees a treaty with Renley on behalf of her son Robb. You might remember Renly swearing he will avenge Ned's death and bring Catelyn Joffrey's head. It's also where Brienne beats Ser Loras in a tourney and is given a place in Renly’s Kingsguard as a reward.


Overnight Location

Ballymena, County Antrim

On The Map: Ballymena is located in County Antrim, in the northeast corner of the island of Ireland. Belfast is just 30 miles away to the south.

Ballymena, also known as the 'City of the Seven Towers', is an attractive town, with some notable features and history. The town was founded on land given to the Adair family by King Charles I in 1626. The King decreed that in return for the land, the town would hold two annual fairs and a free Saturday market in perpetuity. To this day, the town holds one of the largest two-day agricultural shows in Ireland each year, and the weekly Saturday market continues to run! Ballymena is located just 6 miles from distinctive Slemish Mountain (pictured), the legendary first home of St. Patrick in Ireland. After being brought to the country as a slave in the 5th century, St. Patrick reputedly worked for 6 years as a shepherd on the mountain. In more recent times, Ballymena has produced another famous Irish son in Liam Neeson - the well-known actor was born and raised in Ballymena, and was presented with the 'Freedom of the Borough' in 2013.


Ballymena, County Antrim

Accommodation

Galgorm Resort & Spa - More Info - Ballymena, County Antrim

4 Star
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in times are between 2pm - 6pm, please call if you will be arriving outside these hours.


Included Experiences

Titanic Experience Belfast

Belfast, County Antrim

Visit the birthplace of the Titanic and experience the story. Titanic Belfast extends over nine galleries, with multiple dimensions to the exhibition, drawing together special effects, dark rides, full-scale reconstructions and innovative interactive features to explore the Titanic story in a fresh and insightful way; from her conception in Belfast in the early 1900s, through her construction and launch, to her infamous maiden voyage and catastrophic demise. The journey goes beyond the aftermath of the sinking, to the discovery of the wreck and continues into the present day with a live undersea exploration centre. No need to pre-book - use your included admission voucher anytime today!


Must-See Sites

Carrickfergus, County Antrim

On The Map: Carrickfergus is located on the north shore of Belfast Lough, in southeast County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

Carrickfergus is County Antrim's oldest town and one of the oldest settlements in Northern Ireland as a whole. It is a proud, historic town, boasting a beautiful coastal location, a thriving economic hub, and  wonderful surrounding countryside. There’s one sight you simply won’t be able to, or want to miss. Standing on a rocky spur on the northern shore of Belfast Lough, Carrickfergus Castle dominates all approaches to the town. John de Courcy, the Anglo-Norman baron who conquered much of Ulster, began construction of the castle around 1178n and it remained fully garrisoned for 750 years until 1928. Now preserved as an ancient monument, it is open to the public and remains an iconic symbol of the town.


The Dark Hedges (Bregagh Road, Ballymoney), County Antrim

On The Map: The Dark Hedges are located in the northeast of Northern Ireland, just 2.5 miles from the village of Armoy. From Armoy, head west on Carrowreagh Road. Turn left on Ballykenver Road, then right on Bregagh Road - The Dark Hedges Avenue. GPS / SATNAV: 55.1272, -6.3633

This beautiful avenue of beech trees was planted by the Stuart family in the eighteenth century. It was intended as a compelling landscape feature to impress visitors as they approached the entrance to their Georgian mansion, Gracehill House. Two centuries later, the trees remain a magnificent sight and have become one of the most photographed natural phenomena in Northern Ireland. And all this before George R.R. Martin had even the earliest inkling of his wonderful Song of Ice & Fire series! Since then the iconic avenue has been used as a filming location in HBO's epic Game of Thrones - representing the King's Road in the show - and global notoriety has of course ensued!
Featured Scene:
Season 2, episode 1: On the King' s Road, Arya Stark has escaped from King’s Landing, disguised as a boy. She is with Yoren, Gendry, Hot Pie and others who are to join the Night’s Watch, in a cart, travelling north on the King’s Road.


Glens of Antrim, County Antrim

On The Map: County Antrim is located in the northeast corner of Northern Ireland.

The Glens of Antrim (there are 9) are beautifully unique and a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Within twenty square miles you can enjoy natural landscape that covers glacial valleys, sandy beaches, vertical cliffs, tundra plateau, boglands, wooded decidious glens, coniferous forests, waterfalls and picturesque villages! Antrim's coast, from the busy port of Larne to the resorts of Portrush and Portstewart, is dotted with beaches and rocky inlets. Ancient sites and places of intrigue abound too. In addition to wonderful scenery, the landscape is dominated by spectacular ruins of fortresses built by Gaelic chieftains and Norman invaders. Ireland's first inhabitants, nomadic boatmen from Scotland, are believed to have landed in this area around 7000 BC. 


Glaslough, County Monaghan

Accommodation

Castle Leslie - More Info - Glaslough, County Monaghan

Castle
Room Type: Castle Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Enroute Sightseeing

Tollymore Park ("The Haunted Forest"), County Down

On The Map: Tollymore Forest Park is located in the southeast of Northern Ireland. It's just 18 miles east of Newry along the A25, Newry & Bryansfords Roads. GPS Coordinates: 54.224085, -5.944178

Tollymore is a rare treat. A barn dressed up to look like a church, stone cones atop gate piers and gothic-style gate arches, all show the influence of renowned designer, Thomas Wright. A walk along the Shimna river is marked by many curiosities, natural and artificial - rocky outcrops, bridges, grottos and caves. Oak wood from Tollymore was the preferred material for the interiors of the White Star liners including the 'Titanic' which was built in Belfast. Tollymore featured in several Season 1 Game of Thrones scenes.
Featured Scenes:
Season 1: This is the haunting forest in which a member of the Night's Watch rides through the snowy forest and stumbles upon dismembered Wildling bodies. It's also where Ned Stark and his sons come across the gored stag and direwolf pups.


Enroute Sightseeing

Audley's Castle ("Robb Stark's Camp"), County Down

On The Map: Audley's Castle is located just north of Castle Ward (Winterfell), near Strangford in east Northern Ireland. GPS Coordinates: 54.381067, -5.572069.

The castle is named after its late 16th-century owners, the Audleys, an Anglo-Norman family who held land in the area in the 13th century, It was sold, with the surrounding estate, to the Ward family in 1646 and used in 1738 as an eye-catching focus of the long vista along Castle Ward's artificial lake, Temple Water. Audley's Field is currently being used as a filming location in HBO's epic series Game of Thrones, where a lot of dramatic scenes unfold.
Featured Scenes:
Season 2: Audley's Field is the backdrop for Robb Stark's Camp, and the place where he first meets Talisa. Later on, Audley's Field is where Alton Lannister is imprisoned with Jaime (and doesn't live to tell the tale).


Enroute Sightseeing

Castle Ward ("Winterfell"), County Down

On The Map: Castle Ward is located near the coast in the east of Northern Ireland. The town of Strangford is just 2.5 miles to the east of Castle Ward.
GPS Coordinates: 54.367600, -5.581151

Castle Ward is full of personality. Situated in a stunning location overlooking Strangford Lough, the lawns rise up to the unique 18th century house and its Gothic façade. This fascinating house features both Gothic and Classical styles of architectural treatment, internally and externally. Inside the beautiful 820 acre walled demesne you will find an exotic sunken garden and paths that wind their way through woodland and suddenly open onto the quiet shores of the Lough. Castle Ward is the prime Game of Thrones location for Winterfell and the surrounding lands of the North.
Featured Scenes:
Season 1: This is where King Robert Baratheon and his retinue arrive and are met by the Starks. Also where Bran & Osha's Season 1 scenes are filmed.
Season 1 & 2: Castle Ward was used for Winterfell’s Courtyard & Archery scenes.


Enroute Sightseeing

Mourne Coastal Route, County Down

The Mourne Coastal Route stretches from Downpatrick south and west to Warrenpoint, all located in County Down, Northern Ireland. Downpatrick is a busy town with many places of interest including The Saint Patrick Centre, and the Grave of St Patrick next to the Down Cathedral. Travelling onward, the next stop is Strangford, a pretty harbour town good restaurants and pubs. Next up is Ardglass, with seven castles, a marina and golf course, it's well worth a stop. Further along you come to the magnificent, award-winning blue flag beach of Tyrella. There is a beauitiful view of the Mourne Mountains rolling down to the sea at this beach. Further south, you'll encounter the sand dunes at Dundrum, which are among the highest in Europe. South of Newcastle, a lovely beach resort town, the drive passes Bloody Bridge and Maggies Leap en route to the charming fishing village of Annalong. Skirting the Mourne Mountains as you travel further, you'll soon be on the north shore of beautiful Carlingford Lough. On entering Rostrevor you will pass one of the most ancient woodlands in Ireland, Oak Forest. Fans of Game of Thrones can visit two filming locations on this route: Castle Ward, near Downpatrick is Winterfell in the HBO series, and Tollymore Forest Park, west of Newcastle is also regularly used as a filming location.


Overnight Location

Glaslough, County Monaghan

On the Map: Glaslough is located in County Monaghan in the northeast of Ireland and very close to teh border with Northern Ireland. From the main N12 road connecting Monaghan town (to the southwest) & Armagh City (to the northwest), Glaslough is accessed via the R185, intersecting just east of Monaghan town.

Monaghan Town is in the north-central area of the county. It was built near a crannóg (lake-dwelling) in early Christian times, but what you see today really began at the time of the Plantations around 1613, when it became a thriving centre for the linen industry and also for lace-making. Most of the planters were Calvinists from Scotland, and they built the town around three squares, called the Diamond, Church Square, and Market Square. Around the Diamond some fine Classical and Regency buildings survive, including the Market House, now housing the Tourist Office, and the Courthouse. What you notice first, however, is the Rossmore Memorial, an enormous and flamboyant Victorian drinking fountain. In Church Square, appropriately, there’s a Regency Gothic church.


Trim, County Meath

Accommodation

Trim Castle Hotel - More Info - Trim, County Meath

4 Star
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check in time is after 2pm.  Check out is at 12pm the following day.


Included Experiences

Trim Castle

Trim, County Meath

Trim Castle, the largest Anglo-Norman castle in Ireland, was constructed over a thirty-year period by Hugh de Lacy and his son Walter. Hugh de Lacy was granted the Liberty of Meath by King Henry II in 1172 in an attempt to curb the expansionist policies of Richard de Clare, (Strongbow).  Construction of the massive three storied Keep, the central stronghold of the castle, was begun c. 1176 on the site of an earlier wooden fortress. This massive twenty-sided tower, which is cruciform in shape, was protected by a ditch, curtain wall and moat. Many scenes of the epic film 'Braveheart' were filmed at Trim Castle. Today you'll enjoy a guided tour of the old Keep - please note that some areas are very narrow and not wheelchair accessible.


Overnight Location

Trim, County Meath

On The Map: Trim is located in County Meath in the Boyne Valley region of eastern Ireland. The town is accessed via the N3 & R154 from Dublin City (to the southeast) or via the R162 from Navan town (to the north).

The name Trim comes from the Irish 'Baile Atha Troim', which translates as 'the town of the ford of the alder trees' and its origin dates back to the 5th century A.D. Among its more recent claims to fame, is the filming of a major part of 'Braveheart' at Trim Castle (pictured). Trim is part of the Boyne Valley, located on the east coast of Ireland in County Meath, which contains the largest and most decorated megalithic sites in all of Ireland. It has been described as "the largest and most important expression of prehistoric megalithic art in Europe". The large Megalithic sites were built over 5000 years ago between 3800 and 3200 BC - built before both Stonehenge in England and the great pyramids in Egypt! Within a three square mile radius in the Boyne Valley are grouped more than 30 prehistoric monuments including the great passage tombs and their satellite structures, standing stones, barrows and other enclosures. The great sites of the Boyne Valley include Newgrange, Knowth, Dowth, Loughcrew, Fourknocks and the Hill of Tara. Neolithic communities built these sites over earlier sacred spots and it is suspected that they were used for a combination of different purposes, including burial tombs, sacred temples and astronomical observatories.


Must-See Sites

Newgrange, County Meath

On the Map: Newgrange is located just north of Dublin City in County Meath in the east of Ireland. Newgrange is reached via the N51 road, which intersects with the main M1 motorway (connecting Dublin & Belfast) near the town of Drogheda.

Newgrange, in County Meath, crouches on a rise just north of the River Boyne. It is the focal point for a ceremonial area and megalithic cemetery that is 5,000 years old.  The tombs' passage is perfectly aligned to mark the Winter Solstice. Newgrange is one of the best examples in Western Europe of the type of monument known as a passage-grave or passage-tomb. According to the most reliable Carbon 14 dating techniques, Newgrange was constructed around 3200BC. This means it is at least 600 years older than the Giza Pyramids in Egypt, and 1,000 years older than its British counterpart, Stonehenge. If you are interested in visiting Newgrange during summer months, we highly recommend planning to arrive very early in the morning to guarantee entrance to this extremely popular site!


Hill of Slane, County Meath

On The Map: The Hill of Slane is located just north of the town of Slane in County Meath. From Slane Town head north on the N2 road for less than 1 kilometre, making a left turn to arrive at the site.

Steeped in myth and history, the Hill of Slane towers 521 feet above the surrounding countryside, offering breathtaking views. On a clear day, the mounds of Newgrange and Knowth can be seen to the east, with the town of Drogheda and the Irish Sea beyond. The Hill of Slane was a very important site in prehistoric pagan times. The Hill has since become synonymous with Saint Patrick. It is here that Patrick is said to have lit his 'Paschal Fire', in direct defiance of the Pagan Druids at the nearby Hill of Tara. Seeing the flames, the Druids proclaimed that if Patrick’s fire was not put out immediately, it would burn forever in Ireland.... The rest is history! Amongst the interesting ruins on the Hill is 'The Motte', a mound that is probably the burial mound of Sláine, the prehistoric Fir Bolg King. The Motte is mysteriously aligned with other ancient sites, and may have had an astronomical significance. The Hill of Slane is also associated with a mythical healing well, purportedly used by the Tuatha Dé Danann to heal their wounds during battle.


Hill of Tara, County Meath

On The Map: The Hill of Tara is located in County Meath, in the province of Leinster, just 30 minutes drive northwest of Dublin City on the M3 Motorway.

Meath is a county rich in Irish mythology, heritage and plays host to some of the most beautiful rural landscapes on the Emerald Isle. Though best known as the seat of the High Kings of Ireland, the Hill of Tara has been an important site since the late Stone Age when a passage-tomb was constructed there. Tara was at the height of its power both a political and religious centre in the early centuries after Christ. As you walk this historic hill, it is well to keep in mind that in prehistory and historic times, 142 Kings are said to have reigned in the name of Tara. The coronation stone called The Lia Fail or Stone of Destiny has rested here down the ages. And it was here that the most powerful of Irish Kings held their great inaugural feasts and were approved by Earth Mother Goddesss Maeve.  In ancient Irish religion and mythlogy, Tara was revered as a dwelling of the gods and an entrance place to the otherworld of eternal joy and plenty where no mortal ever grew old. In the legends of St Patrick’s mission to Ireland he is said to have first come to Tara to confront the ancient religion at its most powerful site.


Kells, County Meath

On The Map: Kells is located on County Meath, in the east of Ireland, and just one hour northwest of Dublin City, along the M3/N3 Road.

Kells is a quiet small town in the historical Boyne Valley area. It is believed that the beautifully illustrated Book of Kells was completed by the monks of the Kells monastery. The monastery was founded by St. Colmcille in the 6th century and it remained an important centre of religion and learning for over 700 years. Only a few of the buildings remain to this day, but visitors can still admire the well preserved round tower, celtic crosses and a small stone church across the road from the site.


Depart From

Depart from Dublin Airport, County Dublin

Return to Dublin Airport at least two hours prior to your flight's scheduled departure. This will allow ample time to check in for your flight home.

After check-in and passenger security, browse the array of shops on offer at 'The Loop' in Dublin Airport. With an extensive range of stores, bars and cafes, any spare time you have will fly!


Ireland Vacation Pricing Low Season Mid Season High Season
From $1,998
From $2,068
From $2,428

Your Price Includes

ACCOMMODATION

  • 3 Nights in Alluring Irish Castles
  • 5 Nights at Elegant & Historic Country Estates
  • 2 Nights in Boutique 4-Star Hotels

TRANSPORTATION

  • Meet & Greet Private Transfer Service from Dublin Airport
  • Rental Car including our Exclusive Reduced Excess Insurance Package

DINING OPTIONS

  • 10 Sumptuous Full Irish Breakfasts

UNIQUE EXPERIENCES

  • Visit & Explore UNESCO Giant's Causeway
  • Unveil the Compelling Story of the Doomed Liner at Titanic Belfast

INCLUDED ENTRANCES & ADMISSIONS

  • The Book of Kells at Trinity College
  • 6th Century Monastic Site at Clonmacnoise
  • Kylemore Abbey & Victorian Walled Garden
  • Glenveagh National Park & Castle
  • Stunning Dunluce Castle
  • 5,000 Year-Old Newgrange at Bru na Boinne

Prices Based On

  • Prices are per person based on 2 people traveling together and sharing 1 room.
  • All Taxes & Fees Included
  • Risk-Free Cancellation Policy
  • Custom Priced Quote (Want to Add/Subtract Days? Let Us Know!)
  • Self-guided vacation package. Choose any date to begin your travels.
  • Traveling alone? No problem. Just ask us for a Single Supplement price.

“Excellent Vacation”

Oct 4, 2017 by Victor & Linda White. Your Hometown: Fishers, Indiana

Our Ireland vacation was a most enjoyable one. The self driven tour was everything we expected and more. Every B&B provided excellent service and the accommodations were top notch. Jordan was able accommodate our request to include a trip to Inishturk island. My wife was able to make contact with relatives she met for the first time. We are so thankful to Jordan for planning everything and making the adjustments we needed. Excellent service! We will definitely recommend Authentic Ireland to our friends.

“A magical vacation”

Oct 4, 2017 by John Connolly. Your Hometown: Madison, CT

Maggie set up an incredible itinerary. We stayed in beautiful hotels and experienced amazing sites that covered a wide array of the best that Ireland has to offer. She worked with me to customize the trip and the information she sent made negotiating the travel and choosing sites to visit very easy. There was not a single glitch. I recommend using Authentic Ireland without reservation.

“Glad we used Authentic Ireland”

Oct 4, 2017 by Jeff Peters. Your Hometown: Orange, CA

My wife and I wanted to take a trip to the British Isles for our 25th anniversay. We used Authentic Ireland to help plan our itinerary for 12 days in London, Edinburgh, and various locations in Ireland. Kati Lepisto, from AI, arranged for all of our lodging as well as the rental car in Ireland. She included a tour of the Scottish Highlands, and also recommended other activities to round out our trip. Everything worked out perfectly.

All of the hotels recommended by Kati were wonderful, and I was impressed with her thorough and helpful communication both before and during our trip.

Thank you Kati and Authentic Ireland!

“Great Trip”

Sep 21, 2017 by Tom L. Your Hometown: Connecticut

Jordan and the staff at Authentic Ireland listened to our needs and planned a fantastic trip for us . We did the self drive and had no problems what so ever including, all hotels, B&B, Car and pre Paid sightseeing. We did a southern loop including Dublin, Kilkenny, Cork county, Kalarney, the western coasts up to Galway and Connemara. venturing off the beaten path was the best of all. Get yourself lost on a country road and stop to talk to local farmers..They love it and provide great advice for a few secret spots! Thanks again Jordan. We will use and recommend you in the future!

“Ireland Adventure”

Sep 21, 2017 by Mariah. Your Hometown: Greensburg, IN

Edna assisted in planning a dream trip to Ireland for me and my friends, and I could not have been happier with the experience! From the beginning, Edna understood our desire to travel across Ireland on a small budget. She was quick to respond to my questions and willing to make last-minute adjustments when our plans changed. She reserved a rental car for us which was unbelievably easy to pick up and drop off and booked us at B&Bs with comfortable rooms, friendly hosts, and fabulous food. Ireland must be the most stunning place on earth, and I can't thank Edna and Authentic Ireland enough for sending me to this magical place.

I hope to begin planning a trip to Scotland soon and will certainly be using their services!

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