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10-Night Wild Atlantic Gems

Price: From $1,998 Per Person.
10 Nights

The Wild Atlantic Way is the world’s most dramatic coastal landscape and with this 10-night self-drive tour, you will be able to catch every piece of it! The tour will take you through 9 counties and you will be treated to breathtaking scenery as you stay in castles and boutique accommodations along the way! Savor local cuisine and exceptional experiences such as Connemara National Park, The Book of Kells at Trinity College, and Newgrange Stone Age Passage Tomb among many others. Jaw dropping cliff coastline, pristine beaches, thrilling wildlife, and rural villages overflowing with rich history make this tour an unforgettable vacation. As always, this tour can be customized to your liking to bring you the holiday of your dreams! 

Tour Highlights:

ACCOMMODATION

  • 10 nights in Unique & Boutique Accommodations

TRANSPORTATION

  • Economy Automatic Rental Car - With Free Upgrade to a larger size – Winter 2018 Promotion!

DINING INCLUSIONS

  • 10 Scrumptious Irish Breakfasts

ENTRANCES & ADMISSIONS

  • Guinness Connoisseur Experience
  • See The Book of Kells at Trinity College
  • Explore Bunratty Castle and Folk Park
  • Cliffs of Moher Walk with a Local Farmer
  • Marvel at the Benedictine Kylemore Abbey & Gardens
  • Visit Trim Castle - Ireland's Largest Anglo-Norman Castle
  • Discover History and Mystery at Newgrange Stone Age Passage Tomb
  • Relax Your Mind and Body with a Traditional Seaweed Bathing Ritual

POINTS OF INTEREST

  • Temple Bar - Explore the Cobbled Pedestrian Lanes
  • Guinness Storehouse - See the Home of Ireland's Famous Brew
  • Limerick City - Visit the City Boasting a Rich & Turbulent History
  • King John's Castle -  Built for King John of England at the start of the 13th Century
  • Kilkee - Enjoy a Walk from the West End of Kilkee on a Cliff Path along the Outstanding Coastline
  • Loop Head - Head to the Tip of the Peninsula & Visit the Fascinating Loop Head Lighthouse
  • Doolin - Stop in the Adorable Town of Doolin
  • Clifden - Drive the 11km Sky Road Route out West from Clifden
  • Connemara & Glenveagh National Parks - Two of Ireland's Most Scenic Parks
  • Westport & Achill Island - Linked by the Great Western Greenway Pedestrian trail
  • Sligo - Visit Sligo Abbey & the Grave of W.B Yeats at Drumcliff
  • Slieve League - See the Seacliffs Twice as Tall as the Cliffs of Moher
  • Belleek - Home of the Famous Belleek Pottery
  • Boyne Valley - Known for Its Three Large Passage Tombs, Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth, built some 5,000 years ago

Dublin, County Dublin

Arrive at

Arrive at Dublin Airport, County Dublin

Arrive at Dublin Airport after your overnight flight if you are coming from the U.S. or Canada.

Dublin is Ireland's main airport - located just north of Dublin City.
If you are heading downtown, it takes approximately 20 to 30 minutes from the airport, depending on traffic.
There are 2 terminals at Dublin Airport, the second of which opened to air traffic in November 2010.
Most flights from the U.S. (on Aer Lingus, Delta, United, US Airways & American Airlines) arrive into Terminal 2.


Accommodation

Clontarf Castle - Dublin, County Dublin

Castle
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Hotel Tel: 01 833 2321. Earliest check-in is 3:00pm. Luggage may be left at the hotel prior to this time. Check out is before 12:00pm noon.


Included Experiences

Book of Kells at Trinity College

Dublin, County Dublin

Time spent in Dublin would not be complete without a visit to Trinity College. Founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1st, it is one of the oldest universities in the British Isles, and the very oldest in Ireland. Standing on a self contained site in the very heart of Dublin, the College itself covers some 35 acres of cobbled squares and green spaces surrounded by buildings which represent the accumulated architectural riches of nearly three centuries. Although Trinity offers much of interest to the visitor, the crown jewel is without doubt the Book of Kells. The Book is an 'illuminated manuscript', globally celebrated for its lavish decoration. The manuscript contains the four Gospels in Latin based on a Vulgate text, written on vellum (prepared calfskin), in a bold and expert version of the script known as 'insular majuscule'. Written in the 9th century, it has been on display in the famous Old Library at Trinity College Dublin from the mid-19th century, and attracts over 500,000 visitors a year. Two volumes are on public view, one opened to display a major decorated page, and one to show two pages of script. The volumes are changed at regular intervals. Your ticket includes entrance to The Old Library and The Book of Kells - just present your Authentic Ireland voucher on arrival.


Guinness Connoisseur Experience

Dublin, County Dublin

The Connoisseur Experience is the ultimate tasting experience for the ultimate Guinness fan. Gather in the luxurious private bar, discreetly tucked away in a secluded area of the Guinness Storehouse where you will embark on a journey through tastes, traditions, and stories of the most popular variants of Guinness beer - Guinness Draught, Guinness Original, Guinness Foreign Extra Stout, and one of the beers from The Brewers Project range. You will also have the opportunity to learn the craft of how to pour the perfect pint of your very own Guinness. This experience is an exclusive added feature to the general admission tickets which include a self-guided tour of the visitor experience and a complimentary pint of Guinness or soft drink.


Overnight Location

Dublin, County Dublin

On the Map: Dublin, Ireland's Capital City is located on the east coast of the country, and is well served by infrastructure linking it to all parts of the Emerald Isle.

Dublin is a lively cosmopolitan city brimming with culture. You could spend your time strolling the streets soaking up the atmosphere, relaxing in its cafes and bars or you could check out its myriad historical, literary and cultural delights. The 8th century illuminated manuscript, the Book of Kells, must be viewed. It is on display at the impressive Trinity College, Ireland's first university (founded 1592) in the heart of Dublin. For the rest of your time, it is up to you how much you want to pack in. Phoenix Park (twice the size of New York City's Central Park), Georgian Dublin around Stephen's Green, Dublin Castle, the National Botanical Gardens, National Museum, Kilmainham Gaol and the Hugh Lane Municipal Art Gallery are all highly recommended stops on your tour. Then there's the Guinness Storehouse and Jameson Distillery.  A visit to Dublin's Temple Bar to experience the lively Dublin pub culture is a must, though many of Dublin's best bars can be found outside this area in the streets and laneways around Grafton Street, the shopper's street of choice. Purchasing a 'hop-on, hop-off' Dublin Bus Tour ticket is a great way to get around and see all the major sites at a very reasonable cost.


Must-See Sites

Temple Bar, County Dublin

On The Map: Temple Bar lies in the heart of Dublin City. Located on the south bank of the River Liffey, and just west of Trinity College and Grafton Street.

The lively and vibrant Temple Bar District - Dublin's Cultural Quarter, is well worth a visit. Best known for being Dublin’s major nightlife center, Temple Bar comes alive after dark, with many pubs, restaurants and nightclubs to choose from. For those visiting during the day, the area boasts a timeless charm, with narrow cobbled streets and a plethora of cultural organizations, such as the Irish Film Centre & Project Arts Centre. There are also a variety of small galleries and stores - perfect for a day of shopping. While Temple Bar after dark might not be for everyone, the area is the perfect spot to spend a sunny afternoon. 


Guinness Storehouse, County Dublin

On The Map: The Guinness Storehouse is centrally located in Dublin City at St. James Gate, just off Crane Street and south of the River Liffey. The Storehouse is a leisurely 20 minute stroll west of Trinity College.

Come and explore Ireland’s top visitor attraction, providing an unforgettable welcome and a magical journey deep into the heart of the world famous Guinness brand and company. The Guinness Storehouse is located in the heart of the Guinness Brewery at St James’s Gate, Dublin. Housed in an old fermentation plant, the seven-story visitor experience tells the epic tale of Ireland’s iconic drink and brings to life the heritage of Guinness from early days to growth as a global brand, known all around the world. The experience starts standing at the bottom of the world’s largest pint glass, which rises through the building.  It’s a dramatic story that begins over 250 years ago and ends in The Gravity Bar where visitors will receive a complimentary pint of Guinness while relaxing and enjoying spectacular views over Dublin. 


Trinity College, County Dublin

On The Map: Trinity College is located in the heart of Dublin City. Just south of the River Liffey, the campus grounds are bordered by Grafton, College, Pearse, Nassau & Leinster Streets.

Time spent in Dublin would not be complete without a visit to Trinity College. Founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1st, it is one of the oldest universities in the British Isles, and the very oldest in Ireland. Standing on a self contained site in the very heart of Dublin, the College itself covers some 35 acres of cobbled squares and green spaces surrounded by buildings which represent the accumulated architectural riches of nearly three centuries. Although Trinity offers much of interest to the visitor, the crown jewel is without doubt the Book of Kells. The Book is an 'illuminated manuscript', globally celebrated for its lavish decoration. The manuscript contains the four Gospels in Latin based on a Vulgate text, written on vellum (prepared calfskin), in a bold and expert version of the script known as 'insular majuscule'. Written in the 9th century, it has been on display in the Old Library at Trinity College Dublin from the mid-19th century, and attracts over 500,000 visitors a year.


Spanish Point, County Clare

Accommodation

Armada Hotel - Spanish Point, County Clare

4 Star
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2.00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out is before 12.00 noon.


Included Experiences

Bunratty Castle & Folk Park

Bunratty, County Clare

Bunratty Castle is the most complete and authentic medieval fortress in Ireland. Built in 1425 it was restored in 1954 to its former medieval splendor and now contains mainly 15th and 16th century furnishings, tapestries, and works of art, which capture the mood of those times. We invite you to wander through the castle and marvel at the finest collection of medieval furniture in the country. Within the 26 acre grounds of Bunratty Castle, lies Bunratty Folk Park, where 19th century life is vividly recreated. The houses and cottages of the Folk Park spread-out from the foot of the castle's massive walls, much in the way that the cottages and crofts of old would have clustered around its base. Meet and chat with the Bean an Ti (Woman of the House) and various street characters including the Policeman and Schoolteacher, who give the site its sparkle during the summer months. No need to pre-book - use your included admission voucher to visit anytime today!


Overnight Location

Spanish Point, County Clare

On The Map: Spanish Point is located in County Clare on the west coast of Ireland. The seaside village is accessed via the R478 road, which loops from the N67 connecting Lahinch to the northeast, and Kilkee to the southwest.

Spanish Point takes it’s name from the unfortunate Spanish who died here in 1588, when many ships of the Spanish Armada were wrecked during stormy weather. Those who survived the wrecking and sinking of their ships and made it to land were executed by Sir Turlough O'Brien of Liscannor and Boethius Clancy, High Sheriff of County Clare at the time. Nowadays Spanish Point is a lot more welcoming to visitors! Holiday-makers enjoy the beach and seaside activities that are available here during the summer, swelling the local population each year. Spanish Point is one of County Clare's lesser known beaches, making it an attractive spot to visit all year round - especially for those seeking scenic beauty, peace and tranquillity.


Must-See Sites

King John's Castle, County Limerick

On The Map: King John's Castle is located on King's Island in Limerick City, next to the River Shannon.

The impressive walls, towers and fortifications of King John's Castle are remarkably intact - it is one of the best preserved Norman castles in Europe. The Viking Sea-King, Thormodr Helgason, built the first permanent Viking stronghold here in 922. He used the base to raid the length of the River Shannon from Lough Derg to Lough Ree, pillaging settlements. In 943 the Vikings were defeated by the King of Munster and the Limerick Vikings were forced to pay tribute to the clans. The arrival of the Anglo-Normans to the area in 1172 changed everything. This in spite of Domhnall Mór Ó Briain taking the drastic measure of burning the city to the ground in 1174 in a bid to keep it from the new invaders! After Domhnall Mór died in 1194, the Anglo-Normans finally captured the area in 1195. The current castle, built on the orders of King John and bearing his name, was completed around 1200. Between 2011-2013 the castle underwent a massive redevelopment, including a brand new Visitor Centre, interactive exhibitions with computer generated animations, and a cafe with views over the courtyard and river.


Limerick, County Limerick

On the Map: Limerick City is located in County Limerick in the southwest of Ireland. Limerick is well served by a continually improving network of roads - The M7/N7 from Dublin (to the east), N20 from Cork (to the south) and M18/N18 from Galway (to the north).

Founded in 922 by the Danes, who sailed up the Shannon Estuary and built a settlement on an island here, Limerick is the Republic’s third-largest city, after Dublin and Cork. It became the seat of the O’Briens, Kings of Thomond and Munster, under Brian Boru. The Normans, arriving in 1194, established two walled towns, Englishtown and Irishtown, and granted Limerick its royal charter as a city – which makes its charter older than London’s. Limerick’s central location makes it a great base for exploring the neighboring counties of Clare, Kerry, Cork and Tipperary.


Spanish Point, County Clare

Accommodation

Armada Hotel - Spanish Point, County Clare

4 Star
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2.00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out is before 12.00 noon.


Included Experiences

360 Cliffs of Moher Tour

Doolin, County Clare

Centre/Walk/Cruise – Start @ 12 noon
Begin by checking in at the Park and Ride Centre on the R479, where you will be taken by bus to the Visitors Centre. This will give you time to take in the spectacular vistas from the top, including O’Brien’s Tower. Have your lunch, browse the gift shops and get your bearings. At 2pm you will meet your guide, Pat Sweeney, a local farmer from Doolin, outside the centre at the wooden sculpture. Pat will lead you along the Cliffs down to Doolin. This walk will take approximately 2.5 hours, meaning you will arrive in Doolin at roughly 4.30pm, giving you time to grab a coffee and browse the Fisherstreet area of the village. At 5:15pm you will depart Doolin Pier on your cruise beneath the Cliffs of Moher with Doolin2Aran Ferries, this cruise will last approx 1 hour. After your boat trip, you will return to Doolin pier and the shuttle bus will bring you back to the Park and Ride Centre where your journey began.

Walk/Centre/Cruise – Start @ 10am
Meet at 10am outside O’Connors Pub in Doolin. Your guide, Pat Sweeney, will walk with you from Doolin to the Visitors Centre. At the Cliffs of Moher Visitors Centre, you can have your lunch and browse the gift shops. Take in the spectacular vistas from the top, including the view from O’Brien’s Tower. At 2pm you will be brought by minibus back to Doolin pier and at 3:00pm you will depart on your cruise beneath the Cliffs of Moher with Doolin2Aran Ferries. This cruise will last approx 1 hour and finish at 4:00pm at Doolin pier.

Package Includes: Minibus to the Cliffs Centre, admission & all facilities at the Cliffs of Moher Visitors Centre, guided walk along the Cliffs, and Cliffs of Moher Cruise.


Must-See Sites

Kilkee, County Clare

On the Map: Kilkee is a seaside town in County Clare in the west of Ireland. The town is reached via the N68/N67 from Ennis town (to the northeast) or via the N67 along the coast from Lahinch town (to the north).

Kilkee retains some of its 19th century Victorian feel, and also features many modern amenities. The mile-long horseshoe bay is protected from the Atlantic Ocean weather by the Duggerna Reef. Kilkee has seen many famous guests through the years including the Beatles, Che Guevara, Charlotte Bronte (who spent part of her honeymoon in the town) and actor Richard Harris. Walking along the strand you will see the Anchor of the wooden sailing ship Intrinsic of Liverpool, which sank with all hands, during a violent storm in January 1836, in what is now called Intrinsic Bay. The anchor was raised to the surface on the 19th of August 1979.
Kilkee boasts a beautiful golden sandy beach, stretching for over one and a half miles which, with its Blue Flag status, makes it the safest beach on the West Coast of Ireland. There are some breathtaking walks both to the north of the beach where one can explore George's Head (so called as it is said to resemble a former King of England), and to the south where one can walk for sixteen miles along the magnificent cliffs and explore Loop Head. There is a variety of restaurants to be found in Kilkee and like all Irish towns there are numerous pubs providing plenty of entertainment. Traditional Music sessions can be found in a number of pubs and the locals will be more than happy to give you their recommendations! Definitely a must see location for the West Coast.


Cliff Walk Kilkee, County Clare

Although the Cliffs of Moher is a much more popular tourist attraction in Ireland, Kilkee has cliffs that are just as spectacular and you will be able to stroll them without the retaining wall you'll find at Moher. You'll also find the absence of the throngs of motor coaches a blessing.

Experience the dramatic scenery and salty scent of the fresh air on the famous "Cliff Walk" in Kilkee. The walks at both sides of the bay are justly famous. There two sides to the cliffs in Kilkee the East and West ends, in the middle lies the protected bay and shoreline, and when you see it you will realise that it was the obvious place to start a settlement.

On each flank the cliffs rise steeply providing breathtaking panoramic views of the green countryside and the ocean reefs on to which the waves crash with a constant roar sending white foamy froth flying into the air.

The walk on the west end side can be made into a loop by returning to the strand along the road and is well worth the effort but be aware it can be very windy along the path so be careful. The views on a clear day are of the Aran Islands to the north, Kerry to the south and Loop Head to the West. The cliff scenery can only be described as spectacular.  

Whatever you do, don’t forget your camera!


Loop Head, County Clare

On The Map: The Loop Head peninsula is situated in the southwest corner of County Clare on Ireland's western Atlantic coast.

In 2010, the Loop Head Peninsula was acclaimed as a European Destination of Excellence (one of only 22 chosen throughout Europe). The Peninsula offers some of the most beautiful scenic views, walks, untouched traditional Irish landscapes and the cleanest air that you are likely to experience anywhere in Europe. The scenic Loop Head drive, which starts in Kilkee town, heads along the spectacular, rugged coastline to Loop Head Lighthouse. As well as breathtaking cliff walks with wild scenic views, ruined promontory forts and early oratories, there are many more sites not to miss. To mention a few - the natural bridge (Bridges of Ross - pictured), the Moneen Church with its 'Little Ark' - a wooden mobile hut, which once served as a church in earlier times, as well as a number of rare birds, whales, dolphins and seals. On a fine day you can see the hills of Connemara to the north and the mountains of Kerry to the south.


Loop Head Lighthouse, County Clare

On The Map: The Loop Head Lighthouse is situated in the southwest corner of County Clare (the pointy bit!) on Ireland's western Atlantic coast.

Situated at the tip of the Loophead Peninsula, this iconic lighthouse tower has just recently been opened to the public. For a small fee, visitors can take a guided tour up the tower and go out onto the balcony at the very top. From this balcony one can see as far south as the Blasket Islands in Kerry and as for north as the Twelve Bens in Galway – a remarkable and unforgettable vista. The original cottage lighthouse was built here around 1670. The lightkeeper lived in the cottage with his family, and an internal stone stairway led up to a flat stone roof, where a signal light was kept burning. Part of this original building is still used and is situated beside the present tower. This ‘new’ tower was built in 1854. At that time the light was fixed, but in 1869 the present intermittent light came into operation. In 1871 the oil driven rotation machine for the beam was converted to electricity. In 1991 the lighthouse was automated, and the days of the lighthouse keeper were over.


Connemara, County Galway

Accommodation

Abbeyglen Castle - Connemara, County Galway

Castle
Room Type: Superior Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 3:30pm, check-out is before 12:00 noon. Hotel will try and accommodate alternative times, just call on 095 21201.


Included Experiences

Cliffs of Moher Exhibition Centre

Doolin, County Clare

The Cliffs of Moher stand at 214m (700 ft) tall at their highest point and range for 8 kilometres (5 miles) over the Atlantic Ocean. O'Brien's Tower stands proudly on a headland of the majestic Cliffs. On a clear day, one can see the Aran Islands, Galway Bay, as well as The Twelve Pins & Maum Turk Mountains in Connemara and Loop Head to the South. The state-of-the-art Atlantic Edge Interpretive Centre is an exciting and recent development at the cliffs. Housed at the centre of the underground building is a huge domed cave containing images, exhibits, displays & experiences that will delight young and old alike. Visitors enter via a viewing ramp which provides access for all to the main dome. You will 'walk on water' as you enter and follow the bird’s feet from there. The dome is organised into four principal themed areas exploring different elements of the mighty Cliffs of Moher: OCEAN, ROCK, NATURE and MAN. No need to pre-book - use your included admission voucher to visit anytime today!


Overnight Location

Connemara, County Galway

On the Map: Connemara encompasses a large area northwest of Galway City in the west of Ireland. It is most easily accessed via the N59 road that loops around the region and connects the cities of Galway (to the southeast) & Westport (to the northeast).

Northwest of Galway lies the rocky, barren, but breathtakingly stunning region of Connemara. This area is one of the few remaining in Ireland where the native tongue (Gaeilge) is still fluently spoken as a first language. Stop off in the fishing village of Roundstone, where currachs, old style featherweight rowing boats are still in everyday use. The village also boasts an impressive crafts complex, selling everything from teapots and sweaters to traditional Irish music instruments. Clifden, Connemara's capital is well worth a visit and the scenic Sky Road drive just outside town should not be missed.  From here travel north to see the exquisite neo-gothic Kylemore Abbey, nestled in a lush forest on the edge of Kylemore Lake. However long you spend in Connemara you will be constantly enchanted by the ever changing scenery of mountains and valleys, lakes and beaches and bays. This is Ireland's big sky country.


Must-See Sites

Clifden, County Galway

On The Map: Clifden is located on Ireland's west coast in the Connemara Region of County Galway. Clifden is reached via the N59 road from Galway to the southeast, and Westport to the northeast.

Northwest of Galway leads you through the rocky, barren, and breathtakingly stunning region of Connemara. This area is one of the few remaining in Ireland where the native tongue (Gaeilge) is still fluently spoken as a first language. Stop off in the fishing village of Roundstone, where currachs, old style featherweight rowing boats are still in everyday use. The village also boasts an impressive crafts complex, selling everything from teapots and sweaters to traditional Irish music instruments. Finally arrive in the quaint and beautiful town of Clifden, Connemara's capital.  From here travel north to see the exquisite neo-gothic Kylemore Abbey, nestled in a lush forest on the edge of Kylemore Lake. This abbey is the only one in Ireland that is run entirely by nuns.


Sky Road, Clifden, County Galway

On The Map: The Sky Road drive begins in Clifden Town. Clifden is located on Ireland's west coast in the Connemara Region of County Galway. Clifden is reached via the N59 road from Galway to the southeast, and Westport to the northeast.

The Sky Road is an exhilarating 11km/7ml circular drive west of Clifden Town. The Sky Road is well signposted from Clifden. You will first pass Abbeyglen Castle Hotel (on your left), and after approx 400 metres beyond the hotel, take a look back towards Clifden. The 12 Bens mountains provide a wonderful backdrop to the town, and its two church spires, complete Clifden's distinctive skyline. The scenery along the Sky Road is quite simply, stunning. As you travel, the Sky Road separates into the lower and upper roads. The lower road takes you along the shoreline, and although pleasant, the upper road is more popular, owing to the commanding views it offers over the entire area. As the upper road rises, you are treated to breathtaking island & coastline views. There is a good-sized car park at the highest point of the upper road for wonderful photo opportunities. If you continue along the Sky Road thereafter, you will eventually join the main N59 Road, a few kilometres north of Clifden.


Cliffs of Moher, County Clare

On the Map: The Cliffs of Moher are located on the western coast of County Clare. The Cliffs are accessed via the R478 road that connects Doolin (to the north) and the seaside town of Lahinch (to the southeast).

The Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland's top Visitor attractions. The Cliffs stand 214 metres (700 feet) tall at their highest point and range for 8 kilometres over the Atlantic Ocean on the western seaboard of County Clare. O'Brien's Tower, constructed by Sir Cornellius O'Brien in 1835, stands proudly on a headland of the majestic Cliffs. From the Cliffs one can see the Aran Islands, Galway Bay, as well as The Twelve Pins, the Maum Turk Mountains in Connemara and Loop Head to the South. There are two paths to take north and south along the cliff edge, providing spectacular views all the way.  Construction of an award winning eco-friendly Visitor Centre was completed in 2007. The interpretive centre named 'Atlantic Edge' contains state of the art displays and visitor facilities. The grass-roofed building is cleverly set into the hillside - a unique cave-like structure which minimises the visual impact on this fabulously scenic location. 


Connemara, County Galway

Accommodation

Abbeyglen Castle - Connemara, County Galway

Castle
Room Type: Superior Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 3:30pm, check-out is before 12:00 noon. Hotel will try and accommodate alternative times, just call on 095 21201.


Included Experiences

Kylemore Abbey & Victorian Walled Garden

Connemara, County Galway

Set in the Connemara mountains is Kylemore Abbey, a beautiful neo-Gothic Castle. Given it's picture-perfect location, Kylemore is often touted as Ireland's most romantic castle. Built by the English industrialist Mitchell Henry in 1868, visitors to the three reception rooms in the Abbey are touched by its history steeped in romance and tragedy. Kylemore Castle was sold to Benedictine nuns fleeing war-torn Belgium in 1920 and the Castle became an Abbey. Mitchell Henry built the recently re-opened Neo-Gothic Church between 1877 and 1881 as a memorial to his wife following her untimely death. The Church, a ‘Cathedral in Miniature’, is a centre of reflection and prayer for many visitors. Visitors can explore the 6-acre Victorian Walled Garden with it’s magnificent restored buildings. Discover woodland walks, lakeshore walks & nature trails throughout the 1,000 acre estate. Visitors can also see the Mausoleum where the original owners are buried. In the A.V. Room, attached to the Visitor Centre, get a sense of the history of Kylemore Abbey & Garden while viewing the twelve-minute video. No need to pre-book - use your included admission voucher to visit anytime today!


Must-See Sites

Kylemore Abbey, County Galway

On the Map: Kylemore Abbey is located in County Galway, in the midwest of Ireland. The Abbey is accessed via the N59 road that connects the towns of Clifden (to the southwest) and Westport (to the northeast). 

Set in the Connemara mountains is Kylemore Abbey, a beautiful neo-Gothic Castle. Given it's picture-perfect location, Kylemore is often touted as Ireland's most romantic castle. Built by the English industrialist Mitchell Henry in 1868, visitors to the three reception rooms in the Abbey are touched by its history steeped in romance and tragedy. Kylemore Castle was sold to Benedictine nuns fleeing war-torn Belgium in 1920 and the Castle became an Abbey. The Community of Nuns re-opened their International Boarding School here and also established a day school for local girls. Mitchell Henry built the recently re-opened Neo-Gothic Church (under restoration) between 1877 and 1881 as a memorial to his wife following her untimely death. The Church, a ‘cathedral in miniature’, is a centre of reflection and prayer for many visitors. Visitors can also see the Mausoleum where the original owners are buried.


Connemara National Park, County Galway

On The Map: Connemara National park is located in County Galway in the west of Ireland. The main park entrance is close to the village of Letterfrack on the main N59 road that connects Clifden to the south, and Westport to the northeast.

Connemara National Park covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park's mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range. Connemara National Park was established and opened to the public in 1980. Much of the present Park lands formed part of the Kylemore Abbey Estate and the southern part of the Park was at one time owned by Richard 'Humanity Dick' Martin, who helped form the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals during the early 19th century. The Park has a Visitor's Centre (open March to October), that offers an audio-visual presentation about the region. 4 rewarding hiking trails begin at the centre, and a tea-room, playground and picnic area are also available. As well as its great natural beauty, many remains of human presence can be found in the Park. The oldest are megalithic court tombs some 4,000 years old. There is also an early 19th century graveyard about which little is known. Ruined houses, a disused lime kiln, old sheep pens, an ice house, drainage systems and old walls in various parts of the Park, are all evidence of a greater population and more extensive use of these lands in the past.


Sligo, County Sligo

Accommodation

The Glasshouse - Sligo, County Sligo

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check-in time is between 2.00pm & 6.00pm. If you expect to arrive outside these hours, please call the hotel on 071 919 4300.


Overnight Location

Sligo, County Sligo

On the Map: Sligo Town is located in County Sligo in the northwest of Ireland. Sligo is well-served by a good network of major roads - the M4/N4 from Dublin (to the southeast), the N17/N4 from Galway (to the south) & the N15 from Donegal town (to the north).

The mediaeval town of Sligo was initially established in 1245, when the Castle of Sligo was built. The town was attacked and burned many times in subsequent centuries, and the only mediaeval building currently standing in the town is Sligo Abbey. The current Abbey dates from 1414, and Bram Stoker (whose mother was from Sligo), claims that ghost stories about the eerie structure in large part inspired him to write his famous novel, 'Dracula'. Sligo is probably most famous for its close association with the poet W.B. Yeats, and his artist brother, Jack. There's a fine museum and gallery, much of which is devoted to the great man, and his grave at Drumcliff Cemetery is a well-visited attraction. At Carrowmore, in very close proximity to Sligo you will find the 5,000 year-old megalithic tombs of an ancient Celtic people. This is only one of many world-famous megalithic sites in Sligo. Ben Bulben, the distinctive flat-topped mountain (pictured) is right next to the city, and is steeped in Irish folklore, legend and mythology.


Must-See Sites

Westport, County Mayo

On the Map: Westport enjoys a coastal location in County Mayo, in the west of Ireland. The town is accessed via the N59 road from Clifden (to the south), or N5 road from Castlebar (to the east).

Westport is a postcard-pretty town with as lovely a main street as you'll be likely to find anywhere in Ireland. The town lies in the shadow of Croagh Patrick with Clew Bay and its 365 islands just to the west. While in Westport be sure to visit Westport House and climb at least a little of Croagh Patrick. Westport House dates from 1730 and offers everything from a dungeon to a zoo! Croagh Patrick is a 765-meter hill where St. Patrick is said to have banished the snakes from Ireland. This hill is climbed (often barefoot) by thousands of Catholic pilgrims each July. South of Westport are some stunning scenic drives leading into the Connemara region. A trip northwards will bring you to remote Achill island which is accessible by a small bridge. Even further off the beaten path is Belmullet in the northwest corner of County Mayo. Westport also boasts a great selection of traditional pubs, among them Matt Molloy's of the Chieftains. 


Achill Island, County Mayo

On the Map: Achill Island is located off County Mayo on the west coast of Ireland. The island is accessed via land bridge from the N59 road connecting the cities of Westport & Bangor. 

Achill Island is the largest island in Ireland at 60 square miles and is accessible from the mainland by a land bridge. Here you can visit the quaint villages of Dooagh and Dooega, the high cliffs at Slievemore and Minaun and the magnificent beaches at Keel and Keem, under Achill Head. No visit to the Island would be complete without taking a journey of scenic splendour on the famous Wild Atlantic Way Drive which circuits the island. Achill's beautiful unspoiled, remote scenery and clear waters make it ideally suited to outdoor pursuits. You can explore the island's peaceful countryside with a beach walk, hill walk, or even a road walk! You can rent bicycles on the island if you would like to cover more distance. You can climb the highest mountain on the island, Mt. Slievemore (about 1800 feet), with ease and have a remarkable view of the area, or opt take a walk up the third highest point, Mt. Minaun and walk along the Minaun cliffs.


Strandhill Beach, County Sligo

Strandhill Beach is an area of great natural beauty located 5 miles west of Sligo town with panoramic views of Knocknarea and Benbulben.As well as being an extremely popular surfing spot, Strandhill has a number of amazing walks taken from Strandhill Beach to Culleenamore Strand and also to Killaspubrone.Situated on the western edge of Strandhill Village, the Discovery Point offers impressive views inland to Knocknarea Mountain and seaward over Strandhill Beach, Sligo Bay and Coney Island. Large boulders have been built along the line of the promenade to act as a defence system in order to combat coastal erosion. The surrounding landscape and terrain largely consists of marram covered dunes.


Donegal, County Donegal

Accommodation

Lough Eske Castle - Donegal, County Donegal

Castle
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 3:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Overnight Location

Donegal, County Donegal

On the Map: Donegal town is located in County Donegal in the northwest of Ireland. The N15 road connecting the cities of Sligo (to the southwest) and Derry (to the northwest) passes-by just east of the town.

Donegal Town is famous for being the former home to the O'Donnell Clan, who played a pivotal role in Irish history. From the 15th to the 17th century, they provided the main opposition to the colonisation of Ireland by England. The town itself contains Donegal castle, on the banks of the River Eske and the remains of a Franciscan abbey which dates back to the 15th century on the Southern shore of the Bay. The Annals of the Four Masters are traditionally thought to have been started in the abbey in the early 17th century. The story of Red Hugh O'Donnell, Lord of Tyrconnell, was the inspiration behind many books and films, not least, Disney's The Fighting Prince of Donegal (1966).


Must-See Sites

Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery, County Sligo

On The Map: Carrowmore is located just 4 kilometres southwest of Sligo Town, and is reached via the R292 (Strandhill) road which intersects with the main N4 to Dublin.

This is the largest cemetery of megalithic tombs in Ireland and is also among the country's oldest, with monuments ranging from five and a half thousand to six and a half thousand years old. Archaeologists have recorded over 60 tombs of which 30 are visible. A restored cottage houses an exhibition relating to the site. Access to the tombs may be difficult for people with disabilities. Visitors are advised to wear shoes suitable for walking on uneven terrain.


Grave of W.B Yeats at Drumcliff (Sligo), County Sligo

On The Map: Drumcliff is located just 8 kilomeotres north of Sligo Town, along the N15 Road.

Drumcliff is the final resting place of famous Irish poet William Butler Yeats (1865–1939), who is buried in the graveyard of St. Columba's Church of Ireland church. Although Yeats died in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France in January 1939, his remains were brought home to Ireland by the Irish Naval Service and re-interred at Drumcliff in 1948. Yeats' epitaph reads: "Cast a cold eye, On life on death, Horseman, pass by". Yeats himself chose this peaceful churchyard at Drumcliffe in County Sligo as his final resting place, with it’s stunning location at the foot of Benbulben mountain. The graveyard also contains the remains of a round tower and a high cross constructed in the 11th century, when there was a Christian monastery, founded by Saint Columcille in 574 AD on the site.


Sligo Abbey, County Sligo

On The Map: Sligo Abbey is located on Abbey Street, just east of Sligo Town Centre.

Located in the town of Sligo and known locally as the Abbey, this Dominican Friary was founded in the mid - 13th century by Maurice Fitzgerald. The site contains a great wealth of carvings including Gothic and Renaissance tomb sculpture, well preserved cloister and the only sculptured 15th century high altar to survive in any Irish monastic church. This enigmatic friary will inspire and enlighten it's visitors. Access to site is by stone stairway.  It was destroyed in 1414 by a fire, ravaged during the Tyrone War in 1595 and once more in 1641 during the Ulster Uprising. The friars moved out in the 18th century, but Lord Palmerston restored the Abbey in the 1850s. Currently, it is open to the public.


Donegal, County Donegal

Accommodation

Lough Eske Castle - Donegal, County Donegal

Castle
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 3:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Must-See Sites

Slieve League, County Donegal

On the Map: Slieve League is located in County Donegal on the northwest coast of Ireland. The area is accessed via the R263 road that heads west from the fishing village of Killybegs.

The Slieve League cliffs are said to be the highest and one of the finest marine cliffs in Europe. To fully enjoy the spectacle of Slieve League, it is best to leave your car at the car park and walk the few miles to the cliffs so as not to miss the exciting scenery of the area. (You can lift the gate and drive to the top if you are unable to walk. Note there is only a small parking area at the top) There are terrific views of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sligo Mountains and Donegal Bay as you walk towards the exceptionally high top of Slieve League, where the cliff face of Bunglas rises over 600 metres above the raging seas below. Experienced walkers only should venture beyond the viewing point onto One Man's Pass which loops around onto the Pilgrim's Path.


Killybegs, County Donegal

On the Map: Killybegs is a County Donegal coastal town in the northwest of Ireland. The town is accessed via the N56 and R263 from Donegal town (30 minutes away to the east).

Killybegs is Ireland's premier fishing port. Located on the northwest coast of Ireland, this natural harbour provides a perfect gateway to the Atlantic Ocean. It is an excellent place to base yourself when touring the south west of Donegal. A lively fishing town with Ireland's largest fleet of trawlers. Killybegs is a bustling town where local and foreign ships tower over the quayside. With large numbers of both trendy and modern restaurants and the more traditional pubs, Killybegs offers the visitor a variety of good food, drink and entertainment.


Glenveagh National Park, County Donegal

On The Map: Glenveagh National Park lies in the heart of the Derryveagh Mountains in the northwest of County Donegal, in the northwest corner of Ireland. Access from Letterkenny Town is via the N56 road through Kilmacrennan, turning left onto the Gweedore road - R255, or alternatively via Church Hill, and past Gartan and Akibbon Lakes on the R251.

Glenveagh National Park is a remote and hauntingly beautiful wilderness of rugged mountains and pristine lakes. Donegal gets fewer tourists than other locations in Ireland, but with the remarkable backdrops of Mount Errigal (Donegal’s highest mountain) and Muckish, this is one of the most tranquil and scenic national parks in the country. Populated with red deer, the Park, which covers more than 40,000 acres, consists of three areas. The largest of these is the former Glenveagh Estate, including most of the Derryveagh Mountains. To the west are the quartzite hills around Crocknafarragh and to the south, the peatlands of Lough Barra bog, Meenachullion and Crockastoller. Glenveagh Castle and Gardens are at the heart of the park. The castle was built in the 19th century by the controversial John Adair, who evicted no less than 244 tenants from the homes, because they were spoiling his view! Access to the interior is by tour only, but morning and afternoon teas are served in the castle tearooms all season. The Park Visitor Centre houses exhibitions and an audio-visual show.


Trim, County Meath

Accommodation

Trim Castle Hotel - Trim, County Meath

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check in time is after 2pm.  Check out is at 12pm the following day.


Included Experiences

Trim Castle

Trim, County Meath

Trim Castle, the largest Anglo-Norman castle in Ireland, was constructed over a thirty-year period by Hugh de Lacy and his son Walter. Hugh de Lacy was granted the Liberty of Meath by King Henry II in 1172 in an attempt to curb the expansionist policies of Richard de Clare, (Strongbow).  Construction of the massive three storied Keep, the central stronghold of the castle, was begun c. 1176 on the site of an earlier wooden fortress. This massive twenty-sided tower, which is cruciform in shape, was protected by a ditch, curtain wall and moat. Many scenes of the epic film 'Braveheart' were filmed at Trim Castle. Today you'll enjoy a guided tour of the old Keep - please note that some areas are very narrow and not wheelchair accessible.


Overnight Location

Trim, County Meath

On The Map: Trim is located in County Meath in the Boyne Valley region of eastern Ireland. The town is accessed via the N3 & R154 from Dublin City (to the southeast) or via the R162 from Navan town (to the north).

The name Trim comes from the Irish 'Baile Atha Troim', which translates as 'the town of the ford of the alder trees' and its origin dates back to the 5th century A.D. Among its more recent claims to fame, is the filming of a major part of 'Braveheart' at Trim Castle (pictured). Trim is part of the Boyne Valley, located on the east coast of Ireland in County Meath, which contains the largest and most decorated megalithic sites in all of Ireland. It has been described as "the largest and most important expression of prehistoric megalithic art in Europe". The large Megalithic sites were built over 5000 years ago between 3800 and 3200 BC - built before both Stonehenge in England and the great pyramids in Egypt! Within a three square mile radius in the Boyne Valley are grouped more than 30 prehistoric monuments including the great passage tombs and their satellite structures, standing stones, barrows and other enclosures. The great sites of the Boyne Valley include Newgrange, Knowth, Dowth, Loughcrew, Fourknocks and the Hill of Tara. Neolithic communities built these sites over earlier sacred spots and it is suspected that they were used for a combination of different purposes, including burial tombs, sacred temples and astronomical observatories.


Must-See Sites

Belleek, County Fermanagh

On The Map: Belleek is a village in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. While the greater part of the village lies within County Fermanagh, part of it crosses the border into County Donegal, a part of Ulster that lies in the Republic of Ireland. This makes Belleek the westernmost village in the United Kingdom. It had a population of 836 people in the 2001 Census, and is situated within the Fermanagh District Council area.

Belleek is a thriving market town with a variety of pubs, shops, restaurants and a hotel. It is most famous for the fine Parian china produced there at the Belleek Pottery, the oldest pottery in Ireland. The china is valued by collectors from all over the world. It is also a noted location for angling and other recreational activities and is now linked to the River Shannon by canal. A castle was built at Caol Uisce near Belleek at the entrance to Lower Lough Erne by Gilbert Costello in 1212. Belleek town in its present layout was founded on the Blennerhassett estate during the Plantation of Ulster in the early 17th century.


Kells, County Meath

On The Map: Kells is located on County Meath, in the east of Ireland, and just one hour northwest of Dublin City, along the M3/N3 Road.

Kells is a quiet small town in the historical Boyne Valley area. It is believed that the beautifully illustrated Book of Kells was completed by the monks of the Kells monastery. The monastery was founded by St. Colmcille in the 6th century and it remained an important centre of religion and learning for over 700 years. Only a few of the buildings remain to this day, but visitors can still admire the well preserved round tower, celtic crosses and a small stone church across the road from the site.


Trim Castle, County Meath

On the map: Located in Trim, County Meath, Trim Castle is the largest, best-preserved & easily one of the most impressive Anglo-Norman castles in Ireland.

Trim get its name from the Irish áth Truim, meaning ‘The Ford of the Elder Trees', indicating that this was once an important fording point on the River Boyne. In 1172, shortly after the arrival of the Anglo-Normans in Ireland, King Henry II granted Hugh de Lacy the Kingdom of Meath, along with custody of Dublin. For strategic reasons, de Lacy decided to make Trim, rather than Drogheda, the centre of his newly acquired lordship. The castle was converted from a ringfort into a wooden castle. The castle was seen as a threat by the Gaelic Irish and in 1174 it was destroyed by Rory O'Connor, King of Connacht. The following year work began on a more permanent stone replacement and over the following decades, Hugh de Lacy and his son Walter constructed the largest Anglo-Norman castle in Europe. Most of the castle visible today was completed by 1220.


Trim, County Meath

Accommodation

Trim Castle Hotel - Trim, County Meath

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check in time is after 2pm.  Check out is at 12pm the following day.


Included Experiences

Bru na Boinne Visitors Centre, Newgrange & Knowth

Boyne Valley, County Meath

Access to the spectacular ancient monuments at Newgrange and Knowth is only by guided tour from the Brú na Bóinne Visitors Centre. Newgrange crouches on a rise just north of the River Boyne. It is the focal point for a ceremonial area and megalithic cemetery that is 5,000 years old. The tombs' passage is perfectly aligned to mark the Winter Solstice. Newgrange is one of the best examples in Western Europe of the type of monument known as a passage-grave or passage-tomb. According to the most reliable Carbon-Dating techniques, Newgrange was constructed around 3200BC. This means it is at least 600 years older than the Giza Pyramids in Egypt, and 1,000 years older than its British counterpart, Stonehenge. The Brú na Bóinne Visitors Centre includes an extensive exhibition including a full scale replica of the chamber at Newgrange, as well as a full model of one of the smaller tombs at Knowth. There are Audiovisual presentations available, and the Tearoom serves a good range of drinks and tasty snacks. No need to pre-book - use your included admission voucher to visit anytime, but an early arrival is highly recommended to secure your guided tour.


Must-See Sites

Boyne Valley, County Meath

On the Map: The Boyne Valley is a fairly large region located in the east of Ireland in County Meath. Only 30 minutes/ 20km north of Dublin City, the Boyne Valley is accessed via the N2 or N3 roads heading northwest from the city.

The Boyne Valley contains the largest and most decorated megalithic sites in all of Ireland and has been described as "the largest and most important expression of prehistoric megalithic art in Europe". The large Megalithic sites were built over 5000 years ago between 3800 and 3200 BC, built before both Stonehenge in England and the great pyramids in Egypt. Within a three square mile radius in the Boyne Valley are grouped more than 30 prehistoric monuments including the great passage tombs and their satellite structures, standing stones, barrows and other enclosures. The great sites of the Boyne Valley include Newgrange, Knowth, Dowth, Loughcrew, Fourknocks and the Hill of Tara. Neolithic communities built these sites over earlier sacred spots and it is suspected that they were used for a combination of different purposes, including use as burial tombs, sacred temples and astronomical observatories. The nearby towns of Trim, Slane and Navan make ideal bases from which to explore the area.


Hill of Tara, County Meath

On The Map: The Hill of Tara is located in County Meath, in the province of Leinster, just 30 minutes drive northwest of Dublin City on the M3 Motorway.

Meath is a county rich in Irish mythology, heritage and plays host to some of the most beautiful rural landscapes on the Emerald Isle. Though best known as the seat of the High Kings of Ireland, the Hill of Tara has been an important site since the late Stone Age when a passage-tomb was constructed there. Tara was at the height of its power both a political and religious centre in the early centuries after Christ. As you walk this historic hill, it is well to keep in mind that in prehistory and historic times, 142 Kings are said to have reigned in the name of Tara. The coronation stone called The Lia Fail or Stone of Destiny has rested here down the ages. And it was here that the most powerful of Irish Kings held their great inaugural feasts and were approved by Earth Mother Goddesss Maeve.  In ancient Irish religion and mythlogy, Tara was revered as a dwelling of the gods and an entrance place to the otherworld of eternal joy and plenty where no mortal ever grew old. In the legends of St Patrick’s mission to Ireland he is said to have first come to Tara to confront the ancient religion at its most powerful site.


Newgrange, County Meath

On the Map: Newgrange is located just north of Dublin City in County Meath in the east of Ireland. Newgrange is reached via the N51 road, which intersects with the main M1 motorway (connecting Dublin & Belfast) near the town of Drogheda.

Newgrange, in County Meath, crouches on a rise just north of the River Boyne. It is the focal point for a ceremonial area and megalithic cemetery that is 5,000 years old.  The tombs' passage is perfectly aligned to mark the Winter Solstice. Newgrange is one of the best examples in Western Europe of the type of monument known as a passage-grave or passage-tomb. According to the most reliable Carbon 14 dating techniques, Newgrange was constructed around 3200BC. This means it is at least 600 years older than the Giza Pyramids in Egypt, and 1,000 years older than its British counterpart, Stonehenge. If you are interested in visiting Newgrange during summer months, we highly recommend planning to arrive very early in the morning to guarantee entrance to this extremely popular site!


Depart From

Depart from Dublin Airport, County Dublin

Return to Dublin Airport at least two hours prior to your flight's scheduled departure. This will allow ample time to check in for your flight home.

After check-in and passenger security, browse the array of shops on offer at 'The Loop' in Dublin Airport. With an extensive range of stores, bars and cafes, any spare time you have will fly!


LOW SEASON
Jan - Mar | Nov - Dec
From US$1,998
MID SEASON
Apr - May | Sep - Oct
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HIGH SEASON
June - August
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Your Price Includes

ACCOMMODATION

  • 10 nights in Unique & Boutique Accommodations

TRANSPORTATION

  • Economy Automatic Rental Car - With Free Upgrade to a larger size – Winter 2018 Promotion!

DINING INCLUSIONS

  • 10 Scrumptious Irish Breakfasts

ENTRANCES & ADMISSIONS

  • Guinness Connoisseur Experience
  • See The Book of Kells at Trinity College
  • Explore Bunratty Castle and Folk Park
  • Cliffs of Moher Walk with a Local Farmer
  • Marvel at the Benedictine Kylemore Abbey & Gardens
  • Visit Trim Castle - Ireland's Largest Anglo-Norman Castle
  • Discover History and Mystery at Newgrange Stone Age Passage Tomb
  • Relax Your Mind and Body with a Traditional Seaweed Bathing Ritual

POINTS OF INTEREST

  • Temple Bar - Explore the Cobbled Pedestrian Lanes
  • Guinness Storehouse - See the Home of Ireland's Famous Brew
  • Limerick City - Visit the City Boasting a Rich & Turbulent History
  • King John's Castle -  Built for King John of England at the start of the 13th Century
  • Kilkee - Enjoy a Walk from the West End of Kilkee on a Cliff Path along the Outstanding Coastline
  • Loop Head - Head to the Tip of the Peninsula & Visit the Fascinating Loop Head Lighthouse
  • Doolin - Stop in the Adorable Town of Doolin
  • Clifden - Drive the 11km Sky Road Route out West from Clifdnn
  • Connemara & Glenveagh National Parks - Two of Ireland's Most Scenic Parks
  • Westport & Achill Island - Linked by the Great Western Greenway Pedestrian trail
  • Sligo - Visit Sligo Abbey & the Grave of W.B Yeats at Drumcliff
  • Slieve League - See the Seacliffs Twice as Tall as the Cliffs of Moher
  • Belleek - Home of the Famous Belleek Pottery
  • Boyne Valley - Known for Its Three Large Passage Tombs, Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth, built some 5,000 years ago

Prices Based On

  • All Taxes & Fees Included
  • Prices are Per Person based on 2 people traveling together and sharing a room.
  • Traveling Alone? No Problem. Just Ask Us for a Single Supplement Price.

Great Vacation. Fabulous Vacation Planner

Your Hometown: Palo Alto, CA

I cannot speak highly enough about the vacation planning services we received from Amanda. With only 8 days lead time before we were to get on a plane, Amanda arranged a 9 day vacation that will long be remembered. She was patient, kind and had a wonderful sense of humor that remained in place even as I constantly changed parameters on her. I would not hesitate to use Amanda or Authentic Ireland Vacations. I will certainly do so in the future.

Beautiful Ireland

byGwendolyn A GodfreyAuthentic Ireland Travel
Your Hometown: Zephyrhills

We worked with Lauren who arranged a fabulous Ireland trip for us and every detail was taken care of from start to finish. The hotels were wonderful and the Irish people are the very best. Don't hesitate to contact Lauren to plan your Irish vacation, you'll more more than satisfied.

Your Hometown: Dayton

Amazing!! Every single detail was taken care of for us! Heather did a great job! It was so nice to not have to worry about logistics and we could just enjoy Ireland. I would highly recommend if you are renting a car to get an automatic. I drive a standard in the states, but it would have been way to much to think about and would have prevented me from enjoying the county side.

Honeymoon

byElizabeth TravisAuthentic Ireland Travel
Your Hometown: Blacksburg

My husband and I went to Ireland for our honeymoon and it was AMAZING! Heather helped us and honestly, we had such a fun time. We didn't do a lot of the mentioned or planned items because we tend to just like to explore places but the set up to be able to do that if we wanted to or not was amazing!

Ireland

Your Hometown: Knoxville, TN

I am a travel agent and I had the opportunity to work with Tim LeGris which was a wonderful experience . The trip was for a 10 day chauffeured trip for an older couple who wanted to see and stay at castles and manors in Ireland. Tim put together the perfect trip. I had lunch with the couple when they returned. They said it was the best trip ever. Tim, thank you for your expertise and the amazing job you did on such a short notice trip to Ireland!

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