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6-Night Hidden Castles Tour

Price: From $893 per person 6 Nights

Explore hidden castles, ancient sites & spectacular scenery in secret areas of Ireland on our Hidden Castles tour! Irish Castles have a rich history that envelops you as you meander down magnificent hallways, explore mysterious nooks, and indulge in lush gardens. You’ll spend 4-nights sleeping in castles with richly designed bedrooms and gorgeous grounds that exude genuine Irish character. You are close enough to the hum and flair, but just far enough away from the bustle to allow your imagination to sink into the distant past. Your last retreat is a four-star hotel in close proximity to the castle where Braveheart was filmed - just imagine the ambience there!

                            **Use tabs above to view Itinerary, Prices & How to Book.**

Tour Highlights

ACCOMMODATION

  • 4 nights in 2 different Castle Hotels
  • 2 nights in a 4-Star Stately Manor

TRANSPORTATION

  • Rental Car - Includes Insurance, Unlimited Mileage & All Taxes

DINING OPTIONS

  • 6 Breakfasts - Sumptuous Full Irish Breakfasts Each Morning

POINTS OF INTEREST

  • Visit Boyle Abbey & Dun na Ri Forest Park
  • Marvel at the Stunning Sea Cliffs at Slieve League
  • Explore Clonmacnoise Monastic Site & Belvedere House
  • Visit Donegal Town and Carrowmore Megalithic Site
  • Travel to Picturesque Westport Town & Stunning Achill Island
  • Discover the Mysteries of the Boyne Valley and more!

Kingscourt, County Cavan

Arrive at

Arrive at Dublin Airport, County Dublin

Arrive at Dublin Airport after your overnight flight from the U.S. (not included in quoted price!)

Dublin is Ireland's main airport - located just north of Dublin City.
If you are heading downtown, it takes approximately 20 to 30 minutes from the airport, depending on traffic.
There are 2 terminals at Dublin Airport, the second of which opened to air traffic in November 2010.
Most flights from the U.S. (on Aer Lingus, Delta, United, US Airways & American Airlines) arrive into Terminal 2.


Accommodation

Cabra Castle - More Info - Kingscourt, County Cavan

Castle
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out time is before 12.00 noon.


Overnight Location

Kingscourt, County Cavan

On the Map: Kingscourt is located in the southeast corner of County Cavan, in the northeast midlands of Ireland. From the main N2 road connecting Monaghan town (to the north) & Dublin (to the south), Kingscourt is accessed via the R165, which intersects with the N2 just south of Ardee town.

Kingscourt is a busy market town. With Cabra Castle hotel and several B&Bs in the locality, visitors to the town are spoiled for choice. Kingscourt's Catholic Church, sitting on a ridge high above the town, displays excellent stained glass windows by the renowned Irish artist Evie Hone, who also provided designs for Eton College Chapel. Visitors can explore Dun a Rí Forest Park or play 9 holes of golf at Cabra Castle Golf Course. Situated one mile from Kingscourt, Dun a Rí Forest Park is a place of beauty. Situated in a tranquil glen, Dun a Rí is home to stoat, hare, mink, rabbit and otter, as well as red and grey squirrel along the banks of the River Cabra, which runs through the park. Take a romantic walk through deep, leafy glades & over old bridges. See marvellous views north to Slieve Gullion in County Armagh and the Mountains of Mourne. Some interesting features in the park include Cromwell's bridge, a wishing well and an ice house. There are four walks of approximately 1.5 -2km in length around the park.


Must-See Sites

Cavan, County Cavan

On the Map: The county is bordered by County Monaghan, County Leitrim, County Longford, County Meath, County Westmeath and County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland.

Cavan is known as 'The Lakeland County' and is reputed to contain 365 lakes. The O'Reilly clan (still a very common surname in the area) established a castle in Cavan town in the late 13th century. A Franciscan monastery was also established at around the same time. In the 15th century the local ruler, Bearded Owen O'Reilly set up a market which attracted merchants from Dublin and Drogheda. King James I granted the town a charter in 1610. Later, during the seventeenth century, local administrative influence and power transcended to the Maxwell family, descendants of the Bishop of Kilmore from the 1640's, who later became titled Lords Farnham. Development in Cavan during the early 19th century saw the building of a new wide street that still bears the name Farnham Street.


Carlingford, County Louth

On the Map: Carlingford is located in the northeast of Ireland, and splits the distance between the major cities of Dublin (to the south) and Belfast (to the north). From the main M1 motorway connecting Belfast & Dublin, Carlingford is accessed via the R173, intersecting just north of Dundalk.

The small fishing village of Carlingford on the Cooley Peninsula nestles between Slieve Foy, Carlingford Lough and the Mourne mountains. A unique blend of natural beauty, spectacular panoramas, myths and legends combine to make Carlingford a very special place. It is Ireland's best preserved medieval town giving it a unique feel and atmosphere. Carlingford is also the Oyster capital of the country and every August the oyster festival draws huge crowds into the pretty village of white washed cottages and ancient clustered buildings. The mythical Tain Way walking route starts in the town and completing even a short portion of it will reward you with magical views of Carlingford Lough and the Mourne Mountains.


Dun na Ri Forest Park, County Cavan

On The Map: Dun na Ri Forest Park is located just 1.5 kilometres north of Kingscourt in County Cavan, and lies adjacent to the Cabra Castle Estate. From Kingscourt, take the Carrickmacross Road (R179) which initially heads east out of town, before shortly turning north.

The 565 acre Dun na Ri Forest Park runs along the banks of the River Cabra, and features a dramatic gorge embracing part of the Cabra Castle Estate. The area is steeped in both legend & history. It is said that Cuchulain (Ireland's Ancient Superman!) camped in the Park at night, while by day conducting a single-handed defence of Ulster against the armies of Queen Maeve. In the 1600s, the glen echoed to the sounds of Cromwell's marauding British armies. There are four walks of approximately 1.5-2km in length, all with points of interest and plentiful, varied wildlife. Some more unusual highlights of a visit to Dun na Ri are the Ice House, Toba na Splinne Holy Well and Cromwell’s Bridge (pictured). The ruins of Fleming's Castle can still be seen as well as Sarah's Well. Sarah's Bridge, built in 1801, is the starting point of many of the walks in the park. The Park also has an extremely varied plant community and as a result it is rich in a wide range of wild animals. Red and grey squirrels are common, as are stoats and rabbits. Mink flourish along the river and otters have been spotted occasionally. The Irish hare is a resident of the Park as is the pigmy shrew. Norway spruce and oak are two important species in the Park.


Roscommon, County Roscommon

Accommodation

Kilronan Castle Hotel - More Info - Roscommon, County Roscommon

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check in time is after 3.00 pm on your day of arrival. Check-out before 12.00 noon.


Overnight Location

Roscommon, County Roscommon

The name Roscommon is derived from Coman mac Faelchon who built a monastery there in the 5th century. The woods near the monastery became known as Saint Coman's Wood (Ros Comáin). This was later anglicised to Roscommon. The town is the location of a notable archaeological find in 1945 when a lunula, a gold necklace, and two discs were discovered. Both items are dated to the period 2,300 and 1,800 BC. The impressive ruins of Roscommon castle are located on a hillside just outside the town. It was the homeland of The Connachta dynasty, and included such kingdoms as Uí Maine, Delbhna Nuadat, Síol Muirdeach, and Moylurg. In addition, it contained areas known as Trícha cét's, Túath and is the homeland of surnames such as Ó Conchobhair (O'Connor), Mac Diarmada (McDermott), Ó Ceallaigh (Kelly), Ó Birn (Beirne, Byrne, Burns), Mac Donnchadha (McDonough) and Brennan (Mac Branáin and Ó Branáin).


Must-See Sites

Boyle Abbey, County Roscommon

On the Map: Boyle is located in County Roscommon in the northwest of Ireland. The N61 road passes through town, just south of where it intersects with the major N4/M4 road that connects the cities of Dublin (to the east) and Sligo (to the north).

The famous Abbey at Boyle was the first successful foundation in Connacht of the Cistercian order of monks, which had opened its first Irish house at Mellifont, County Louth, in 1142. Though mutilated during the 16th & 17th centuries, when it was used to accommodate a military garrison, Boyle Abbey is nevertheless a very well preserved monastery. Dominated by a squat square tower dating from the 13th century, the Abbey has certainly retained its ability to impress visitors. The Abbey design was influenced by styles from Burgundy, from where Cistercians came to Ireland. The decorated corbels and capitals were likely carved by local masons, some of them members of the so called ‘School of the West’. This same School is responsible for creating some of the most inventive architectural sculpture of the 13th century in Ireland's west. A restored gatehouse dating from the 16th & 17th centuries houses an exhibition.


Carrick-on-Shannon, County Leitrim

On The Map: Carrick-on-Shannon is located in County Leitrim in the northwest midlands of Ireland. The town is situated just off the main N4 road, that connects Dublin to the southeast, and Sligo to the northwest.

A bustling town, Carrick-on-Shannon is now one of the most popular inland resorts in Ireland. It is situated on the shores of the majestic River Shannon and is both the county town of Leitrim and the cruising capital of the Shannon. From Carrick-on-Shannon (or Carrick as its known locally), the beauty and wonders of the River Shannon & Shannon Erne Waterway awaits. With 750km of cruising available, the town is ideally situated at the gateway to both the River Shannon to the south and the Shannon-Erne Waterway to the north. Carrick is also widely acknowledged as an Anglers paradise and within a 10km radius of the town there are no fewer than 41 lakes. Carrick is steeped in history and signposted walking tours of the town allow you to discover its interesting historical buildings, in particular the Workhouse and Famine Graveyard, Hatley Manor, St George's Church of Ireland, and the Costello Chapel (reputedly the smallest chapel in Europe).


Roscommon, County Roscommon

Accommodation

Kilronan Castle Hotel - More Info - Roscommon, County Roscommon

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check in time is after 3.00 pm on your day of arrival. Check-out before 12.00 noon.


Must-See Sites

Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery, County Sligo

On The Map: Carrowmore is located just 4 kilometres southwest of Sligo Town, and is reached via the R292 (Strandhill) road which intersects with the main N4 to Dublin.

This is the largest cemetery of megalithic tombs in Ireland and is also among the country's oldest, with monuments ranging from five and a half thousand to six and a half thousand years old. Archaeologists have recorded over 60 tombs of which 30 are visible. A restored cottage houses an exhibition relating to the site. Access to the tombs may be difficult for people with disabilities. Visitors are advised to wear shoes suitable for walking on uneven terrain.


Glencar Waterfall, County Leitrim

On The Map: Glencar Waterfall lies about 8 miles north of Sligo town, and 5 miles west of Manorhamilton, just off the N16 road that connects the two towns.

With a drop of approx. 50 feet, Glencar Waterfall is not the largest in the world. It does however occupy a wonderfully scenic and romantic location, and is particularly impressive after rain. The setting and charm of the waterfall inspired Ireland's famous poetic son, W.B Yeats, and is mentioned in his poem, 'The Stolen Child'. The falls are accessed via a lovely wooded walk and on-site picnic facilities are provided. There are more waterfalls visible from the road, but none are quite as romantic as this one! The waterfall is adjacent to serene Glencar Lake on the Sligo / Leitrim border - a most enchanting area.


Slieve League, County Donegal

On the Map: Slieve League is located in County Donegal on the northwest coast of Ireland. The area is accessed via the R263 road that heads west from the fishing village of Killybegs.

The Slieve League cliffs are said to be the highest and one of the finest marine cliffs in Europe. To fully enjoy the spectacle of Slieve League, it is best to leave your car at the car park and walk the few miles to the cliffs so as not to miss the exciting scenery of the area. There are terrific views of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sligo Mountains and Donegal Bay as you walk towards the terrifyingly high top of Slieve League, where the cliff face of Bunglas rises over 600 metres above the raging seas below. Experienced walkers only should venture beyond the viewing point onto One Man's Pass which loops around onto the Pilgrim's Path.


Donegal, County Donegal

On the Map: Donegal town is located in County Donegal in the northwest of Ireland. The N15 road connecting the cities of Sligo (to the southwest) and Derry (to the northwest) passes-by just east of the town.

Donegal Town is famous for being the former home to the O'Donnell Clan, who played a pivotal role in Irish history. From the 15th to the 17th century, they provided the main opposition to the colonisation of Ireland by England. The town itself contains Donegal castle, on the banks of the River Eske and the remains of a Franciscan abbey which dates back to the 15th century on the Southern shore of the Bay. The Annals of the Four Masters are traditionally thought to have been started in the abbey in the early 17th century. The story of Red Hugh O'Donnell, Lord of Tyrconnell, was the inspiration behind many books and films, not least, Disney's The Fighting Prince of Donegal (1966).


Roscommon, County Roscommon

Accommodation

Kilronan Castle Hotel - More Info - Roscommon, County Roscommon

4 Star
Room Type: Double

Check in policies:

Check in time is after 3.00 pm on your day of arrival. Check-out before 12.00 noon.


Must-See Sites

Croagh Patrick, County Mayo

On The Map: Croagh Patrick is a 2507 ft mountain, located just 5 miles southwest of Westport town in County Mayo.

Croagh Patrick is Ireland's sacred mountain, and has been since ancient times. In pre-Christian Ireland it was the focus of the harvest festival of Lughnasa, traditionally held around August 1. The mountain was especially important for women, who would sleep on the summit during Lughnasa to encourage fertility. According to Christian tradition, St. Patrick went up the sacred mountain at festival time in 441 AD. After fasting at the summit for 40 days, he banished all the snakes and demons from Ireland. The site quickly became an important place of Christian pilgrimage & a stone oratory dating from between 430 and 890 AD was recently discovered on the summit. Nowadays, as many as one million pilgrims and visitors make the trek to the top to pray at the stations of the cross, participate in Mass, do penance (in which case the rocky journey is undertaken barefoot!) or simply to enjoy the spectacular view.


Connemara National Park, County Galway

On The Map: Connemara National park is located in County Galway in the west of Ireland. The main park entrance is close to the village of Letterfrack on the main N59 road that connects Clifden to the south, and Westport to the northeast.

Connemara National Park covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park's mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range. Connemara National Park was established and opened to the public in 1980. Much of the present Park lands formed part of the Kylemore Abbey Estate and the southern part of the Park was at one time owned by Richard 'Humanity Dick' Martin, who helped form the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals during the early 19th century. The Park has a Visitor's Centre (open March to October), that offers an audio-visual presentation about the region. 4 rewarding hiking trails begin at the centre, and a tea-room, playground and picnic area are also available. As well as its great natural beauty, many remains of human presence can be found in the Park. The oldest are megalithic court tombs some 4,000 years old. There is also an early 19th century graveyard about which little is known. Ruined houses, a disused lime kiln, old sheep pens, an ice house, drainage systems and old walls in various parts of the Park, are all evidence of a greater population and more extensive use of these lands in the past.


Achill Island, County Mayo

On the Map: Achill Island is located off County Mayo on the west coast of Ireland. The island is accessed via land bridge from the N59 road connecting the cities of Westport & Bangor. 

Achill Island is the largest island in Ireland at 60 square miles and is accessible from the mainland by a land bridge. Here you can visit the quaint villages of Dooagh and Dooega, the high cliffs at Slievemore and Minaun and the magnificent beaches at Keel and Keem, under Achill Head. No visit to the Island would be complete without taking a journey of scenic splendour on the famous Wild Atlantic Way Drive which circuits the island. Achill's beautiful unspoiled, remote scenery and clear waters make it ideally suited to outdoor pursuits. You can explore the island's peaceful countryside with a beach walk, hill walk, or even a road walk! You can rent bicycles on the island if you would like to cover more distance. You can climb the highest mountain on the island, Mt. Slievemore (about 1800 feet), with ease and have a remarkable view of the area, or opt take a walk up the third highest point, Mt. Minaun and walk along the Minaun cliffs.


Westport, County Mayo

On the Map: Westport enjoys a coastal location in County Mayo, in the west of Ireland. The town is accessed via the N59 road from Clifden (to the south), or N5 road from Castlebar (to the east).

Westport is a postcard-pretty town with as lovely a main street as you'll be likely to find anywhere in Ireland. The town lies in the shadow of Croagh Patrick with Clew Bay and its 365 islands just to the west. While in Westport be sure to visit Westport House and climb at least a little of Croagh Patrick. Westport House dates from 1730 and offers everything from a dungeon to a zoo! Croagh Patrick is a 765-meter hill where St. Patrick is said to have banished the snakes from Ireland. This hill is climbed (often barefoot) by thousands of Catholic pilgrims each July. South of Westport are some stunning scenic drives leading into the Connemara region. A trip northwards will bring you to remote Achill island which is accessible by a small bridge. Even further off the beaten path is Belmullet in the northwest corner of County Mayo. Westport also boasts a great selection of traditional pubs, among them Matt Molloy's of the Chieftains. 


Celbridge, County Kildare

Accommodation

Celbridge Manor - More Info - Celbridge, County Kildare

4 Star
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out before 11:00am.


Enroute Sightseeing

Clonmacnoise, County Offaly

On the Map: Clonmacnoise is located on the banks of the River Shannon in the very middle of Ireland. The major town of Athlone is only a few miles to the north, through which the main M6 road passes. The M6 connects Dublin City (to the east) and Galway City (to the west)

The ancient monastic site of Clonmacnoise is situated at the crossroads of Ireland in County Offaly and dates back almost 1,500 years. St. Ciaran, the son of an Ulsterman who had settled in Connaught, chose the site in 545 AD because of its ideal location at the junction of river and road travel in Celtic Ireland. The location borders the three provinces of Connaught, Munster and Leinster. The monastery is on the east side of the River Shannon, in what was then the Kingdom of Meath, but occupying a position so central it was the burial-place of many of the kings of Connaught as well as those of Tara. The site includes the ruins of a cathedral, seven churches (10th  -13th century), two round towers, three high crosses and the largest collection of Early Christian grave-slabs in Western Europe. The original high crosses and a selection of grave-slabs are on display in the visitor centre. The long and varied history of Clonmacnoise is recounted in an audiovisual presentation shown in the visitor centre. There are also exhibitions that are dedicated to the flora, fauna and landscape of the region.


Enroute Sightseeing

Belvedere House & Gardens, County Westmeath

On The Map: Belvedere House is located just south of the town of Mullingar in County Meath. The Estate is easily accesseed from the M6 motorewsay connecting Dublin & Galway. Exit the M6 at Junction 4 and proceed north on the N52 road for approx. 11 kilometres.

Belvedere House & Gardens is a magnificent 160 acre Lakeside Estate, replete with a fully restored 18th century Georgian Villa. The Estate includes a Victorian Walled Garden, The Enchanted Glen - a secret Faery Garden, and a number of 'Romantic Follies', including the largest in Ireland - 'The Jealous Wall'. Belvedere House was designed by the famous architect Richard Castles, and was built for Lord Belvedere in 1740, as an 'escape' from the ordeals of family life at his nearby main residence - Gaulstown House. Robert's wife, Mary Molesworth, spent 31 years under house arrest at Gaulstown, owing to a suspected affair, and led to Robert being known as The Wicked Earl! A different but related argument with his brother George, led to Robert erecting the Jealous Wall in 1760 to block his view of his brothers much larger house, Rochfort (now Tudenham) house!


Overnight Location

Celbridge, County Kildare

On The Map: Celbridge is located 23 miles west of Dublin City. It is most easily accessed by the R403 & R405 roads, which intersect with the main M4 Motorway connecting Dublin & Galway Cities.

The development of Celbridge commenced with the building of Kildrought House in 1720. The present day houses on Main Street and in the town centre were built over the subsequent two hundred year period. Celbridge boasts several important historical buildings and famous sons. Number 22 Main Street was for a time occupied by Richard Guinness and his son Arthur was born there. Arthur went on to form the Guinness Brewery. Castletown House (pictured), was constructed in 1722, and is situated at the end of an avenue extending from the main street of Celbridge. Castletown is Ireland's largest and arguably finest Palladian Country House. Two features of particular note are the 80-foot blue and gold Long Gallery, and the main cantilevered staircase. Reputedly, only three staircases of this kind were ever constructed, and one lies at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, aboard the doomed Titanic. Celbridge Abbey was built in 1703, and is another beautiful structure, with many tales of woe to tell. In recent years Celbridge has expanded dramatically, yet most of the towns services and amenities still centre on the single main street.


Celbridge, County Kildare

Accommodation

Celbridge Manor - More Info - Celbridge, County Kildare

4 Star
Room Type: Double/Twin

Check in policies:

Check-in time is after 2:00pm on your day of arrival. Check-out before 11:00am.


Must-See Sites

Hill of Slane, County Meath

On The Map: The Hill of Slane is located just north of the town of Slane in County Meath. From Slane Town head north on the N2 road for less than 1 kilometre, making a left turn to arrive at the site.

Steeped in myth and history, the Hill of Slane towers 521 feet above the surrounding countryside, offering breathtaking views. On a clear day, the mounds of Newgrange and Knowth can be seen to the east, with the town of Drogheda and the Irish Sea beyond. The Hill of Slane was a very important site in prehistoric pagan times. The Hill has since become synonymous with Saint Patrick. It is here that Patrick is said to have lit his 'Paschal Fire', in direct defiance of the Pagan Druids at the nearby Hill of Tara. Seeing the flames, the Druids proclaimed that if Patrick’s fire was not put out immediately, it would burn forever in Ireland.... The rest is history! Amongst the interesting ruins on the Hill is 'The Motte', a mound that is probably the burial mound of Sláine, the prehistoric Fir Bolg King. The Motte is mysteriously aligned with other ancient sites, and may have had an astronomical significance. The Hill of Slane is also associated with a mythical healing well, purportedly used by the Tuatha Dé Danann to heal their wounds during battle.


Newgrange, County Meath

On the Map: Newgrange is located just north of Dublin City in County Meath in the east of Ireland. Newgrange is reached via the N51 road, which intersects with the main M1 motorway (connecting Dublin & Belfast) near the town of Drogheda.

Newgrange, in County Meath, crouches on a rise just north of the River Boyne. It is the focal point for a ceremonial area and megalithic cemetery that is 5,000 years old.  The tombs' passage is perfectly aligned to mark the Winter Solstice. Newgrange is one of the best examples in Western Europe of the type of monument known as a passage-grave or passage-tomb. According to the most reliable Carbon 14 dating techniques, Newgrange was constructed around 3200BC. This means it is at least 600 years older than the Giza Pyramids in Egypt, and 1,000 years older than its British counterpart, Stonehenge. If you are interested in visiting Newgrange during summer months, we highly recommend planning to arrive early in the morning to guarantee entrance to this extremely popular site.


Trim, County Meath

On The Map: Trim is located in County Meath in the Boyne Valley region of eastern Ireland. The town is accessed via the N3 & R154 from Dublin City (to the southeast) or via the R162 from Navan town (to the north).

The name Trim comes from the Irish 'Baile Atha Troim', which translates as 'the town of the ford of the alder trees' and its origin dates back to the 5th century A.D. Among its more recent claims to fame, is the filming of a major part of 'Braveheart' at Trim Castle (pictured). Trim is part of the Boyne Valley, located on the east coast of Ireland in County Meath, which contains the largest and most decorated megalithic sites in all of Ireland. It has been described as "the largest and most important expression of prehistoric megalithic art in Europe". The large Megalithic sites were built over 5000 years ago between 3800 and 3200 BC - built before both Stonehenge in England and the great pyramids in Egypt! Within a three square mile radius in the Boyne Valley are grouped more than 30 prehistoric monuments including the great passage tombs and their satellite structures, standing stones, barrows and other enclosures. The great sites of the Boyne Valley include Newgrange, Knowth, Dowth, Loughcrew, Fourknocks and the Hill of Tara. Neolithic communities built these sites over earlier sacred spots and it is suspected that they were used for a combination of different purposes, including burial tombs, sacred temples and astronomical observatories.


Depart From

Depart from Dublin Airport, County Dublin

Return to Dublin Airport at least two hours prior to your flight's scheduled departure. This will allow ample time to check in for your flight home.

After check-in and passenger security, browse the array of shops on offer at 'The Loop' in Dublin Airport. With an extensive range of stores, bars and cafes, any spare time you have will fly!


 

Ireland Vacation Pricing Low Season Mid Season High Season
From $893
From $969
From $1089

Your Price Includes

ACCOMMODATION

  • 4 nights in 2 different Castle Hotels

TRANSPORTATION

  • Rental Car - Includes Insurance, Unlimited Mileage & All Taxes

DINING OPTIONS

  • 6 Breakfasts - Sumptuous Full Irish Breakfasts Each Morning

Prices Based On

  • All Taxes & Fees Included
  • Risk-Free Cancellation Policy
  • Custom Priced Quote (Want to Add/Subtract Days? Let Us Know!)
  • Self-guided vacation package. Choose any date to begin your travels.
  • Prices are per person based on 2 people traveling together and sharing a room.
  • Traveling alone? No problem. Just ask us for a single supplement price.
Dec 5, 2016 by Donald Barratt. Your Hometown: Lombard

Our Vacation was outstanding. The hotel (City stay St. Augustine) in Dublin was centrally located to everything we wanted to visit. The staff there was courteous, and helpful.Our visit to Roscommon was grand, and our stay at Gleeson's B & B was also nice with great food.Authentic Ireland did a great job setting everything up, and making our vacation worry free.A million thanks to Lonna a job well done.

“5 days in Ireland”

Dec 5, 2016 by Dan Karns. Your Hometown: Dillsburg, PA

Authentic Ireland was referred to me by a customer/friend of mine....and... i am so glad he did. We worked with Shannon, one of the representatives, and i couldn't be more happy with the experience and expertise that she had regarding details of our trip. I told her when we were arriving and leaving Ireland, what were the "must do" things during our stay, and what kind of accommodations we wanted to stay in. within a day or two, she had a full trip package, with other recommended things to do while there, sent to my email. the price was very reasonable, and after going on the trip, i appreciated the fact we used Authentic Ireland to get everything set up. kudos to the site and staff, especially Shannon. anytime i had a question, she had an answer. regarding car rental, electricity usage, what kind of money to keep on hand, anything... she was so much help. thank you so much!, you made our 20 year anniversary "holiday" that much better! the only thing i can even think about regretting, was that we didn't spend enough time there we spent the previous week in London, and think we should have cut that shorter and spent more time in Ireland... but.... that can be fixed by another visit! thanks again! your friends in Pennsylvania!

“Ireland Adventure”

Dec 4, 2016 by Jesse. Your Hometown: Charlotte, NC

Had a great experience working with the Authentic Ireland associate! I probably asked 9 million questions (this being my first international trip I'd planned), and patience and courteousness definitely describes the person that personally handled my account.The trip was great as well, including an itinerary that was well chosen, then tweaked for us. Rental car was indeed perfect for our crew that was traveling, as well as the accommodations arranged for us. I'm more of a researcher, but the website definitely put me leaps ahead with suggested places to visit at our lodging locations, as well as places to stop along the way.One of the only things I would have done differently was the transportation for our time in Dublin. I was so glad that we did not rent a vehicle for Dublin, but the sightseeing bus tour passes were not the most convenient for our purposes, in retrospect. We would have been better served with normal city bus passes. I also would have passed on the castle stay in our trip, but perhaps we just caught them at a bad time, as everything was great there, except the smell of cat urine just on the outside of the side door near our room.Authentic Ireland definitely impressed both myself and the members of my family that joined us on this trip! Definitely recommend them! Really great trip and a good price!

“Wonderful First Trip to Ireland”

Dec 4, 2016 by Alyssa Sommers. Your Hometown: Mahwah, NJ

This was our first trip to Ireland. You guys did a wonderful job of taking care of all of the details in regards to hotels, sites to visit with passes and car rentals. Each hotel and bed and breakfast was wonderful. All establishments offered breakfast in the morning. They all had WIFI. After spending 2 days in Dublin we left for the west coast in the car we rented. We spent the next 6 days traveling around the west/southwest part of Ireland. Maggie was the person that we dealt with at Authentic Ireland and she was great- she noticed that our hotel on the last night was over 2 hours away from Shannon airport so she moved us to a closer location... and what a location a 5-star castle!! There are no other words then amazing!! When we come back which we plan to do... we will be staying there.

“Outstanding Vacation”

Nov 5, 2016 by Anthony M. Kolankiewicz. Your Hometown: Jerusalem

The company did an outstanding job of arranging our circumnavigational tour of Ireland and Northern Ireland over a period of 17 days. We did the driving ourselves with an upgraded rental car, which offered the utmost flexibility in sightseeing destinations and route options. Our accommodations were in a combination of country homes, B&Bs, hotels, and a couple of castles.. Even the weather generally cooperated over such an extended period of time; only one day and one evening of steady rain that interfered with our plans. Overall, it was a delightful vacation that encouraged us to return for catch the attractions we didn't have time to see. There were only two quibbles we would mention. First, some of the driving directions left a lot of details out, especially in trying to get through larger towns and cities, such as Galway. More details would have saved us lots of time. Second, we very much enjoyed every place we stayed with the exception of the Lissyclearig Thatched Cottage in Kenmare. Unlike all the other places we stayed, our hosts' main concern was saving money and doing everything on the cheap. No heat in the rooms despite a chilly, rainy night and two cloudy days -- very uncomfortable! No WiFi connection (the only place not to offer it during our entire stay in the country). Even the breakfast was second-rate. Few choices on the buffet table and canned fruit instead of the fresh fruit we received in every other location. Might be time to drop this inn from the inventory! Otherwise, a great trip that we would do again through Authentic Ireland.

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